Immigration and Settlement

Settlement worker recognition

Resolution number: 
11
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. Settlement workers provide essential services in providing support during transition and adaptation of immigrants and refugees;
  2. Settlement workers have immense linguistic, cultural and crosscultural skills that are in demand by both the host community and immigrants and refugees;
  3. The majority of settlement workers are immigrants, visible minorities and women;
  4. Two of the four priority groups as identified by the federal government's employment equity plan are visible minorities and women;
  5. The ISAP contracts provided by the Department of Immigration to settlement agencies refuse to acknowledge and/or provide funding for any benefits except those mandated by law (i.e. CPP and UIC);
  6. Settlement agencies are independent and should not be subject to government wage freezes;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR write to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration urging him to fully recognize Settlement Worker skills by providing funds to allow settlement agencies to implement an adequate salary structure and benefit package including health and retirement plans.

Research

Resolution number: 
10
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. Community-based organizations across the country engage in research activities around the issues of immigrant and refugee services;
  2. There is a severe lack in funding these research activities at the grass roots level;
  3. Funders usually contract out research on immigrant and refugee services delivery to private consultants and academics;
  4. Research results are in consequence inadequate and not pertinent to the real needs of immigrant/refugee and ethnocultural communities across Canada;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Call upon all funders and particularly the federal government to recognize the value of research activities carried out by community-based immigrant and refugee organizations;
  2. Call upon all funders and particularly the federal government to provide financial resources for community-based organizations to continue to improve and expand research activities on immigrant/refugee service delivery;
  3. Continue to provide at the semiannual consultation a forum for community-based organizations to present the results of and exchange information on the various research activities across the different regions.

Access to health care services for refugee claimants

Resolution number: 
9
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. Health service is a right in Canada;
  2. Eligibility to the new Interim Federal Health Programme will be based on response of refugee claimants at points of entry and inland immigration offices to the question: "will you be able to cover any medical costs you may incur while your claim is being processed?";
  3. The claimant will be intimidated and scared to answer "no" for fear that this would jeopardize their claim;
  4. The claimant will be required to sign a declaration of eligibility (IMM-1442) at the point of entry or inland office;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR: 

  1. Urge the Federal Immigration Department to consider the removal of any eligibility criteria to be asked at the point of entry or inland offices at a time when claimants are seeking asylum;
  2. Request that the question of ability to pay for medical costs be removed and that health services be made available unconditionally to all claimants regardless of ability to pay;
  3. Urge the Department of Citizenship and Immigration to remove the mandatory condition that claimants sign the declaration of eligibility.

Immigrant and refugee mental health

Resolution number: 
8
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The settlement and adaptation process has been recognised in the Report "After the Door has been Opened" to have significant mental health aspects;
  2. The federal Ministries of Human Resources, Citizenship and Immigration, Canadian Heritage, and Health are concerned with the successful settlement of Immigrants and refugees;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR request that:

  1. The above mentioned Federal ministries continue to implement the recommendations of the report "After the Door Has Been Opened";
  2. These Ministries pay particular attention to and review the mental health effects of their policies;
  3. These Ministries urge the Provincial Ministries of Health to recognise cross cultural mental health counselling by including costs for these services under the Provincial Health Plans.
Subject: 

Racism: media portrayal

Resolution number: 
7
June 1994
Whereas: 

The media portrayal of refugees and immigrants has tended to focus on the negative rather than the positive;

Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR encourage its member organizations to monitor and respond to the media portrayal of refugees and immigrants and to advocate for more balanced coverage, and that the CCR member organizations having experience in media monitoring and media relations make their expertise known to the CCR for sharing among its members.

Anti-racism and equity

Resolution number: 
6
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. Ministries of Education and Boards of Education across Canada are developing and implementing policies of Race Relations and Ethno-cultural Equity;
  2. Anti-racism education is most effective when it involves participants in a process that addresses attitudinal change;
  3. Member groups of CCR have grassroots, community experience, as well as an analysis from international experience, in the meaning and effects of racism;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR communicate with the Ministries of Education with a list of CCR member groups and the recommendation that Boards of Education be encouraged to communicate with these groups as sources of local resource people for teacher workshops, classroom presentations and representation on policy-shaping committees at the Board level.

Anti-racism education

Resolution number: 
5
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. Racism is a reality in Canadian society;
  2. In particular, racism is reflected in refugee and immigrant selection policies;
  3. The deepening economic recession has stimulated even more backlash against refugees and immigrants;
  4. Another important reflection of racism is the manner in which refugees and immigrants are treated after arrival. There are numerous racial discriminations which appear in the public and the political domain. As a result Canadian refugees and immigrant people of colour and their children are being systematically prevented from participating in the Canadian mosaic;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That:

  1. The CCR as a priority undertake a programme of public education to dispel refugee myths. One major undertaking should be the incorporation into press releases of the contribution of newcomers to this society;
  2. The CCR incorporate a statement into all its external and internal documents, such as its mission statement and its By-Laws, that part of the role of the Council is to actively promote an anti-racist perspective/initiative in all its work;
  3. The CCR set up an internal core group that includes representation from the diverse refugee and immigrant communities to devise strategies to combat racism;
  4. As part of its mandate, the core group encourage linkages between immigrant and refugee groups.

Female genital mutilation

Resolution number: 
4
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) affects over 114 million women and girls in the world;
  2. An estimated 6 - 8 million girls under the age of 10 undergo the process of female genital mutilation each year;
  3. Female genital mutilation is the removal of, or injury to, any part of the female genital organ. The three main types are:

    Type 1) Clitoridectomy ("sunna") which may involve:

    1. Pricking the clitoris to induce bleeding,
    2. partial removal of the clitoris,
    3. complete removal of the clitoris

     

    Type 2)  Excision - removal of the clitoris and partial or complete removal of the labia minora

    Type 3) Infibulation ("Pharaonic mutilation") removal of the clitoris, labia minora, parts of the labia majora and the stitching together of the vulva (infibulation) to obliterate the urethra and the vaginal orifice except for a small opening (Women's Health in Women's Hands);

  4. Female Genital Mutilation is valued as a significant ritual within the cultures and communities in which it is practised but it has no valid religious or spiritual basis;
  5. Female Genital Mutilation can cause death in extreme cases or will leave the young woman with ongoing, lifelong health problems such as urinary and menstrual flow retention, dysmenorrhoea, infections of the reproductive and urinary tract, chronic pelvic infection, problems with childbirth, with sexual activity and chronic pain;
  6. Female Genital Mutilation is specifically identified as illegal in many countries and in Canada it is considered as child abuse in the section of physical abuse and aggravated assault;
  7. Female Genital Mutilation is child abuse but is also a violation of women's human rights, is violence against women, is violence against women's sexuality, is torture;
  8. Most importantly, Female Genital Mutilation is being practised in refugee camps, and it is well known what the sanitary conditions of refugees camps are like to undertake a radical surgery such as FGM;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Recommend to the UNCHR to recognise that Female Genital Mutilation is a human rights issue, and that it should be treated as such;
  2. Request that the Criminal Code of Canada be amended to specifically identify Female Genital Mutilation as a criminal act, and explore the possibility of appropriate new legislation;
  3. Urge the Federal and Provincial Ministries to appropriate funds and resources to provide counselling and support groups for the victims of FGM, for educational programmes to take place within the communities in which Female Genital Mutilation is practised and in order for the affected communities to educate the mainstream Canadian society, in particular, health service providers and educational institutions;
  4. Continue to pursue the issue of Female Genital Mutilation through information sharing, education and in advocacy;
  5. Explore the inclusion of FGM on the platform for action in the upcoming fourth world conference on Women, in Beijing 1995;
  6. Urge Canada to provide protection to women and to women and their daughters who are fleeing the FGM practice.

Settlement and mainstream services

Resolution number: 
3
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. All social service agencies (mainstream and non-governmental) hold as fundamental principles that services must meet the specific needs of the populations served and that clients have the right to self-determination;
  2. All social services must respect the clients' choice as to the most appropriate service delivery system and offer diverse models of services to meet these individual needs;
  3. The understanding of settlement needs of immigrants and refugees has developed significantly over the past 10 years and has responded to the reality that newcomers' adjustment is of varying length depending on a variety of factors, which include language, cultural, social supports and integration, etc;
  4. Non-governmental settlement service agencies have evolved in meeting these needs and have developed a very comprehensive and specialized knowledge base for service delivery;
  5. Mainstream services are only beginning to address the issue of access to services by an increasingly diverse population;
  6. The accessibility and adequacy of such services are only in the developmental stages and these service agencies are still struggling with their internal adjustments to personnel and organizational change;
  7. Historically, non-governmental settlement services have not only been pioneers but have been providing leadership in developing settlement services to a constantly changing population;
  8. Mainstream social services are increasingly calling on the expertise of non-governmental settlement services to assist them in their transition to providing more accessible and culturally appropriate services to a population that they have not served in the past;
  9. Non-governmental settlement services have been meeting, and will continue to meet the needs for service in this area;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR communicate to the appropriate governmental and social service bodies at every possible opportunity that:

  1. Non-governmental settlement services are an integral part of the social service delivery system and that the expertise of these services must be fully recognized;
  2. Non-governmental settlement services must have equal access to funding for social services; 3. Ongoing funding must be made available to ensure continuity of services and to maintain quality of services through appropriate resources for planning, delivery and evaluation.

Scope of settlement and integration services

Resolution number: 
2
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. Immigrant serving agencies play a key role not only in the initial settlement but also the integration of newcomers so that they may become participating members of the larger society;
  2. The settlement and integration process varies from one individual to another and can take anywhere from a few months to over a decade;
  3. Immigrant serving agencies are in a unique position to outreach to their community, assess needs and provide early detection of problems and intervention;
  4. Immigrant serving agencies are equipped with skills and professional expertise to provide specialized services, such as family counselling, employment and job training, etc. based on a variety of service models;
  5. Immigrant serving agencies may provide a wide range of holistic and culturally appropriate services which are not available in "mainstream" service agencies;
  6. Immigrants are entitled to choices for services which they consider most appropriate and acceptable (including specialized services at immigrant serving agencies);
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR undertake to communicate to the government that:

  1.   Immigrant settlement services should not be limited to new arrivals within a restricted time period (wherever limitation exists);
  2. Immigrant serving agencies are qualified not only to provide initial settlement services but also a wide range of specialized services such as family counselling, employment and job training, etc.;
  3. Immigrant serving agencies should have equal access to funding to meet unmet needs of the community they serve, including those needs which extend beyond the initial stage of settlement.

SMIS national working group

Resolution number: 
1
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. Certain clients will not be accessing the services they need if they are aware that information about them will be transmitted to the government;
  2. NGOs' integrity cannot be comprised by supplying confidential information to the government;
  3. NGOs are not satisfied that SMIS has taken into consideration the operational implications or workload on them, nor are they convinced of the accuracy and therefore usefulness of the performance indicators;
  4. Citizenship and Immigration Minister Marchi announced the creation of a National Working Group to reach a compromise agreement on outstanding issues that will be mutually acceptable to the NGO community and the Government;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR urge: 

  1. That a moratorium be placed on the implementation and piloting of the SMIS until such time as a mutually acceptable agreement is reached by the National Working Group;
  2. That the National Working Group be comprised of:
    1. one provincial representative nominated by each of AMSSA, AAISA, SAISA, MICA, OCASI, and one for the Atlantic Region;
    2. an Information Technology Expert, nominated by the CCR;
    3. a legal expert on privacy, nominated by the CCR;
    4. an expert on programme evaluation, nominated by the CCR;
    5. a refugee client of a CCR member agency;
    6. an immigrant client of a CCR member agency;
    7. government staff including Settlement and Integration Policy, Research and Settlement Operations;
  3. That the National Working Group be co-chaired by an NGO and a government representative;
  4. That the agreements reached by the National Working Group be implemented in a timely fashion;
  5. That the NGO representatives keep the refugee and immigrant services organizations fully informed of the progress and seek their input including but not limited to the following issues:
    1. client confidentiality
    2. who has access to the reports produced
    3. a review of the mandatory information required
    4. what clients and programmes can be exempt from the SMIS reports
    5. the use and the meaningfulness of the performance indicators
    6. what kind of reports will be generated and how will they be used
    7. the security of the data
    8. what process will be used to ensure that planning will be collaborative;
  6. That sufficient funding be made available to the NGO representatives for:
    1. travel
    2. consultation
    3. telephone and fax
    4. expert advice
    5. honoraria for refugee and immigrant client representatives.

Bonds

Resolution number: 
4
November 1994
Whereas: 

bonds would create an insurmountable barrier to family sponsorship for sponsors, many of whom are already economically marginalized;

Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Adopt as its position that no form of bonds should be considered as a viable option for ensuring compliance in sponsorship agreements;
  2. Communicate this position to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration.

Myths and public education

Resolution number: 
3
November 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The economic recession has created an increase in anti-immigrant and anti-refugee sentiments;
  2. The government has also contributed to the propagation of damaging myths about refugees and immigrants by releasing data on sponsorship breakdown without providing the appropriate context;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Urge that the government play a leadership role in public education to dispel the negative myths about refugees and immigrants and increase resources to allow non-governmental groups to do so effectively;
  2. Ask all CCR members to urge the media to be fair and balanced in their coverage of refugee issues.

Priority for programs to integrate adolescent newcomers

Resolution number: 
2
November 1994
Whereas: 
  1. Current research and documentation identifies extra barriers impeding the successful integration of adolescent newcomers, such as language, racism and interrupted schooling;
  2. Canada's social and economic resources are increased when newcomer youth become equal participants in Canadian society;
  3. Completion of formal education, labour force participation and economic self-sufficiency are essential to equal participation;
  4. There is a lack of adequate programming for adolescent newcomers to address identified barriers;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR write to the Federal Ministers of Human Resources Development and Citizenship and Immigration, asking that they accord immigrant and refugee youth a high priority in Federal Government program development and funding.

Clearing house

Resolution number: 
1
November 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The "10 Year Framework" refers to the creation of a National Clearing House or Information Sharing Network on Settlement;
  2. CCR is the national organization representing NGOs serving newcomers to Canada;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Enter into discussions with C&I with the intention of housing this initiative;
  2. The Executive Committee be authorized to submit a proposal to C&I for the establishment and operation of an independent clearing house for settlement-related research, information and documentation.

Death of the sponsor

Resolution number: 
3
November 2013
Whereas: 
  1. CIC stops processing a permanent resident application upon the death of the applicant, and stops processing a sponsorship application upon the death of the sponsor;
  2. Stopping the process affects family members who are included as dependants in the application;
  3. Canada has an obligation to consider the best interests of affected children and act in accordance with humanitarian and compassionate principles.
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR call on CIC, in the case of the death of the sponsor or principal applicant, to ensure that:

  1. The permanent residence application is processed to completion taking into account the best interests of the child and other humanitarian and compassionate considerations.
  2. If the persons concerned are in Canada this processing be completed prior to potential removal.

Eliminate income requirement for Family Reunification

Resolution number: 
2
November 2013
Whereas: 
  1. Family  reunification is a central objective of the immigration programs of Canada and Quebec;
  2. Canada has signed and ratified international conventions which affirm the principle of family unity and that the family is entitled to protection by society and the state;
  3. These positions are affirmed in CCR’s Family reunification Resolution of June 1997, Increased commitment to family reunification Resolution of November 2011 and several other CCR resolutions;
  4. Proof of minimum income requirement is already exempted for certain family members such as spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner or dependent child;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR call on the governments of Canada and Quebec to abolish the minimum income requirement for all classes of family class sponsorship.

We are Treaty Peoples

Resolution number: 
1
November 2013
Whereas: 
  1. Canada as a nation has yet to fully respect the Indigenous nations and honour their inherent rights as acknowledged by the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and provided for by the many subsequent Treaties.
  2. Injustices and harms have been – and continue to be – perpetrated upon Indigenous peoples as a result of the colonization of the First Peoples and the racist policies of the governments in Canada.
  3. Despite Canada's economic prosperity, First Peoples continue to experience a disproportionate level of poverty and related disparities as compared to the rest of the population.
  4. As Treaty peoples, we share a vision for Canada which promises fairness, respect, justice, equality and prosperity for everyone on these lands and territories.
  5. We believe that the first critical step towards realizing that vision is the rebuilding and renewing of the relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples of Canada through a process of reconciliation that fully honours our respective roles as Treaty peoples.
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR honour all the Treaties upon which this country is founded and which bind all of us as Treaty peoples.

Age of Dependency

Resolution number: 
2
June 2013
Whereas: 

The Government of Canada is proposing to reduce the maximum age of dependants in the Immigration and Refuge Protection Regulations from under 22 years of age to under 19 years of age;

Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR advocate that the criteria of dependency for children remain as they currently appear in the regulations (age under 22 years, full-time students and children with a disability).

Refugee Resettlement Program Changes

Resolution number: 
1
June 2013
Whereas: 
  1. The Department of Citizenship and Immigration has outlined forthcoming changes to Canada’s Refugee Resettlement Program that use both protection and immigration criteria and, among other changes, call for a limiting of the numbers of refugees resettled who have high needs for services and support to achieve integration; furthermore these changes will unfairly disadvantage women refugees, the elderly and other vulnerable groups;
  2. The changes include criteria for selection based on Canada’s foreign or economic interests and ministerial interests;
  3. Recent changes to Canada’s Immigration Program will ensure that more immigrants will arrive with skills and expertise that will reduce the needs for settlement and integration services and supports;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR advocate that:

  1. Resettlement of refugees is first and foremost a tool of protection which must be the main motivation for Canada’s refugee resettlement program;
  2. Foreign policy interests and other political or economic interests have no place in a humanitarian program;
  3. The criteria defining the ability to successfully establish in Canada have no place in an humanitarian program that focuses on protection and should be eliminated entirely from the Refugee Resettlement Regulations;
  4. Federal and provincial governments increase resources for programs and services to facilitate better integration outcomes especially when the refugee has high needs and may require different levels of support over a longer period of time.

Indigenous Peoples

Resolution number: 
1
December 2012
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR’s 2003 resolution calls on its members to sensitize themselves on the issues facing First Nations communities and explore ways of having meaningful dialogue with these communities;
  2. The CCR needs to further this position by taking concrete action to strengthen relationships with indigenous communities;
  3. The CCR also must incorporate awareness of the history and present realities of indigenous peoples in our activities and our work;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR Consultation and summer and winter Working Group meetings acknowledge the Indigenous territory on which they take place, and where appropriate invite and involve indigenous community members.

Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP)

Resolution number: 
2
June 2012
Whereas: 

The federal government announced reductions to the Interim Federal Health Program in April 2012 and these changes are slated to come into effect on June 30th, 2012.

Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR calls upon the provinces and territories:

  1. To urge the federal government to stop the changes to the Interim Federal Health Program.
  2. To consult and work with affected communities and those that work with those communities to ensure all persons affected by the announced IFHP reductions receive the health care they need.
Subject: 

Caregivers, Live-in Status and Family Reunification

Resolution number: 
4
November 2011
Whereas: 
  1. The live-in caregiver program currently requires workers to live in the employer’s home;
  2. Living in the employer’s home creates a greater possibility for sexual and labour exploitation;
  3. The program does not allow family members to accompany the worker until they fulfill their required hours, thereby leading to family separation for a minimum period of 2 years;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR request that:

  1. The "live-in” requirement be removed from the conditions of the program;
  2. Caregivers’ families be allowed to accompany them or join them in Canada at any point during their participation in the program.

Visitor Visas for Parents and Grandparents

Resolution number: 
3
November 2011
Whereas: 
  1. The government is introducing multiple entry visas of up to 10 years to allow parents and grandparents to visit family here as a way to address long family separations caused by processing delays;
  2. The visitors are required to purchase medical insurance in order to qualify for the visa;
  3. Canada imposes visa requirements only on some countries, mostly in the global south and those with a majority racialized population;
  4. Racialized Canadians are over-represented among those who would be most affected;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR demand that the government of Canada remove proof of purchase of medical insurance on the multiple ten year visas for parents and grandparents.

Increased commitment to family reunification

Resolution number: 
2
November 2011
Whereas: 
  1. Family  reunification is a central objective of Canada's immigration programs
  2. The CCR has called on the government to eliminate barriers to family reunification;
  3. Extended families including parents and grandparents are important to social and economic wellbeing of families, including those of refugees and immigrants;
  4. The sponsorship of parents and grandparents have had a lower overall priority in family reunification applications for the last few years;
  5. The moratorium on these applications will close the door to some of these family members;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR call on the government of Canada, through CIC, to demonstrate its commitment to family reunification by:

A) rebalancing immigration levels so that families make up at least 40% of the total;

B) expanding the definition of families to reflect the realities of diverse cultural communities;

C) removing barriers to reunification by allocating the resources needed to process applications in a timely manner.

Immigration levels

Resolution number: 
1
November 2011
Whereas: 
  1. Canadians, many private and public stakeholders and governments agree that Canada needs immigrants to sustain its current prosperity;
  2. Canada has received immigrants in excess of 1% of the population in several previous years and has become stronger as a result;
  3. Immigration has strengthened Canada's multicultural and multifaith fabric;
  4. Canada is attempting to fill its demographic needs through temporary rather than permanent immigration;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR demand that the government of Canada set immigration levels at a minimum of 1% of the population and invest the resources needed for successful settlement and integration.

Subject: 

Interim federal health care program

Resolution number: 
7
November 1996
Whereas: 
  1. There are apparent administrative and service delivery problems in the current Interim Federal Health Care Program in relation to: a) access to services. b) time delays in receiving essential health care. c) loss of health care practitioners due to delays in payment and the complexity of paperwork. d) a lack of harmony between the provinces and the Federal Program. all of which creates risks to health and well-being of the clients.
  2. There are also concerns with the legality of providing a different level of basic health care service for some people living in Canada as compared with others.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Request a meeting between representatives of the CCR and the responsible officials in the federal government to share the issues and problems perceived in the Interim Federal Health Care Program and attempt to cooperate in making appropriate revisions to ensure efficient and relevant health care service delivery to the clients covered by the Interim Federal Health Care Program.
  2. Working together with provincial umbrella organizations, insist that the provincial and federal governments address gaps in coverage and establish consistency of service and coverage across Canada.
Subject: 

Citizenship and Immigration Canada downsizing

Resolution number: 
6
November 1996
Whereas: 
  1. There is continual downsizing of direct service of CIC offices i.e.. mail-in services (Vegreville and Mississauga); reduction in CIC staff; reduction in hours of access; the use of tele-centres; and the introduction of 1-888 phone lines which direct calls from some provinces to offices located in another province.
  2. These changes are causing (a) a significant decrease in access to services, information and support (the existence of which allows clarification of information and procedures preventing delays and complications in individual immigration related issues); (b) a significant decrease in the quality of service due to less personal contact; (c) a significant increase in workload of NGOs and community support who lack resources to respond to the needs.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Write to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration expressing our concerns about her department's downsizing having a deleterious effect on services and increasing the work (unpaid) of NGOs and requesting that a freeze be put on any further downsizing of CIC staff providing direct client service.
  2. Include in this correspondence a request for a user evaluation to be done of mail-in services and use of local and 1-888 tele-centres.
  3. Request that CIC work with the CCR to develop a process which ensures quality and access of CIC services, federally and locally.

LINC program devolution

Resolution number: 
5
November 1996
Whereas: 
  1. Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) is an integral part of settlement through its orientation of newcomers to Canada and the cultural adaptation that occurs through its instruction.
  2. LINC has not provided and was never intended to provide English competency which would enable immigrants to find employment.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR urge CIC:

  1. Not to classify LINC as a training program as this would result in its transfer to the province as part of the federal commitment to devolve all training to the provinces.
  2. To continue to see LINC as an integral part of settlement services.

Settlement renewal

Resolution number: 
4
November 1996
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR has adopted and transmitted to the Government of Canada resolutions on Settlement Renewal (res. 4, May 1995, res. 2, November 1995, and res. 4, June 1996) which: a) Requested that national fora of all stakeholders be established to develop and monitor definitions of settlement, accountability mechanisms, and national principles and standards for settlement services. b) Developed for the government's review a set of national principles, including, inter alia, principles on client rights and eligibility for service, eligibility of service providers, priority setting processes, accountability mechanisms, and an enduring federal role.
  2. The consultation process on settlement renewal has indicated a growing reluctance on the part of the Government of Canada's preferred partners to take on increased responsibility for the administration of settlement services, and a growing apprehension among service providers that further devolution of the Government of Canada's responsibilities will undermine the integrity of settlement services.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Reaffirm its resolutions on Settlement Renewal.
  2. Call on the Government of Canada to:
  3. Establish a National Working Group on Issues related to Settlement Renewal.
  4. Halt the devolution of its responsibility for the administration of settlement services and maintain its primary responsibility for the settlement of immigrants and refugees.
  5. Work with existing provincial and regional authorities to ensure that service mechanisms and programs meet provincial and regional needs.
  6. In conjunction with all stakeholders, build on the experience and knowledge gained through the Settlement Renewal process to improve administrative and delivery systems, and develop nationally acceptable principles, definitions and standards for the funding, administration and delivery of settlement services.
  7. maintain and enhance the integrity of settlement services by ensuring that the current funding envelop which includes ISAP, HOST, LINC and AAP is not dismantled or reduced.
  8. Work towards achieving healthy partnerships which recognize and respect the autonomy and expertise of community agencies delivering settlement services.
  9. Make a commitment to see the above points as interdependent and to implement all of the above points.

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