Immigration and Settlement

Equity for International Students

Resolution number: 
4
June 2019
Whereas: 
  1. The federal, provincial and territorial governments are increasingly recruiting international students as a source of permanent residents, as they are already partially integrated and therefore require fewer post-diploma settlement services (ex. language training);
  2. Applicants for students visas are rejected if they express the desire to stay in Canada permanently, while Canada’s economic immigration system encourages international students to apply for permanent residency at the end of their studies;
  3. Their precarious status puts them in positions of vulnerability (ex. labour exploitation, conjugal violence);
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR take the position that:

  1. Prospective international students should not be penalized in their visa application if they declare their desire to apply for permanent residency upon graduation.
  2. The federal and Quebec governments finance full access to settlement and other support services for international students and their dependants.

Housing

Resolution number: 
3
June 2019
Whereas: 
  1. Housing is a human right;
  2. Canada’s affordable housing crisis is impacting all medium to low-income Canadians, including immigrants and refugees. The impact of building further affordable housing through the National Housing Strategy will take time and does not address the crisis of today;
  3. Social assistance levels allocations are not adequate given the high cost of rents. The need for affordable housing outstrips what is presently available;
  4. The lack of shelter and dedicated services geared to arriving refugee claimants is creating a crisis within existing shelter systems and is increasing homelessness;
  5. Refugee claimants face absolute homelessness upon their arrival. Presently, refugee claimants are not eligible for the same supports as government-sponsored or privately sponsored refugees;
  6. Safe and affordable housing is critical to the successful settlement of refugee families and individuals;
  7. The CCR passed Res.: 5 , Nov 2005 on housing;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR:

  1. Call on all levels of governments responsible for housing and settlement to allocate more resources for accessible and affordable housing and to review the provision of adequate income and social assistance levels to facilitate access to safe, secure and affordable housing for all refugee claimants.
  2. Urge the inclusion of refugees and refugee claimants in the development and allocation of affordable housing projects.
  3. Encourage all levels of government to fund the development of appropriate short-term housing solutions for arriving refugee claimants, which include settlement services.
Subject: 

Eliminating barriers to Canadian citizenship

Resolution number: 
5
November 2018
Whereas: 
  1. The Citizenship Act requires “adequate” knowledge of English or French, and of Canada and the rights and responsibilities of citizenship; these requirements are translated by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada to require:
    1. up-front proof of Canadian Language Benchmark Level 4/ Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens (NCLC) niveau 4, and
    2. achieving a score of at least 15/20 on the citizenship exam which can only be written in English or French;
  2. Women, refugees, and sponsored spouses’ applications for Canadian citizenship are disproportionately refused because of these particular requirements;
  3. There are several known factors that impede additional language acquisition including: trauma; low literacy in one’s first language; lack of access to formal education; first language distance from English/French, and socio-economic needs;
  4. The current “compassionate waiver” framework from these requirements emphasizes the need to prove a permanent medical condition through completion of a Medical Opinion Form;
  5. Challenging citizenship refusals requires obtaining leave from the Federal Court, and therefore the need to hire a lawyer;
  6. The citizenship fee has tripled in the past 5 years, and is now $630 for adults.
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR call upon the Canadian government to:

  1. Ensure the administration of the citizenship regime conforms with the Act to:
    1. Reduce the language and knowledge requirements to the “adequacy” required;
    2. Ensure broad compassionate discretion in the assessment of waivers from language and knowledge requirements, and eliminate the Medical Opinion Form.
  1.  Amend the Citizenship Act to:
    1. Remove the English/French language requirement for writing the citizenship exam
    2. Revert to the ability of citizenship applicants to challenge a refusal in Federal Court as of right, given the importance of the rights at stake.
    3. Eliminate the fee.
Subject: 

Poverty Reduction

Resolution number: 
4
November 2018
Whereas: 
  1. People with precarious immigration status disproportionately experience poverty, homelessness and underhousing, food insecurity and income insecurity;
  2. Federal, provincial and territorial poverty reduction legislation, policies and strategies implicitly  exclude migrant workers and people with precarious immigration status by not naming them;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR call on federal, provincial and territorial governments to explicitly include all residents of Canada in poverty reduction measures, including migrant workers, refugee claimants and other residents with precarious immigration status.

Subject: 

Disaggregated Data

Resolution number: 
3
November 2018
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR has two resolutions on poverty Racialization of poverty (Res.: 1 , Nov 2016) and Poverty circumstances of Government-Assisted Refugees (Res.: 2 , Nov 2005)
  2. Federal, provincial and territorial government legislation and policies should be based on sound evidence (including, but not limited to demographic and user data) that is representative of the experiences of all residents of Canada;
  3. Publicly available census and other administrative data is not representative of all residents of Canada;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR call on federal, provincial and territorial governments to:

  1. Collect and make publicly available full access to disaggregated data;
  2. Ensure that legislation and policies that impact on poverty are informed by disaggregated data.

Criminality and Double Punishment

Resolution number: 
1
December 2017
Whereas: 
  1. Some people commit crimes in Canada. Those who are citizens have one punishment. Those who are permanent residents or protected persons face additional punishments, including:
  • criminal inadmissibility (with or without a right of appeal);
  • loss of permanent resident status and deportation;
  • prohibition on applying for citizenship for a certain period of time.
  1.  People who arrived in Canada as minors, people from racialized communities, and persons living with mental health issues, and who never obtained citizenship, are disproportionately affected by this differential treatment, and may face deportation despite having lived in Canada for most of their lives; 
  2. Discretionary relief on humanitarian and compassionate grounds, while important, is not an adequate remedy;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR take the position that criminal inadmissibility should not apply to permanent residents and protected persons in Canada who have lived in Canada for at least three of the past five years. 

Vicarious Trauma for frontline workers

Resolution number: 
1
June 2017
Whereas: 
  1. There is prolonged stress on the job in serving refugees and immigrants;
  2. There is a high risk for front line workers to face vicarious trauma when working with clients;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR ask federal and provincial funders of settlement services to increase funding for professional development and designate specific funds for training and support for staff in vicarious trauma, self-care, and trauma informed care.

Racialization of poverty

Resolution number: 
1
November 2016
Whereas: 
  1. The gap between rich and poor in Canada is widening generally, and disproportionately impacts racialized group members;
  2. Inequalities with respect to economic status, health, learning outcomes and more are deep and persistent among members of racialized groups;
  3. These are products of structural and systemic racism and exclusion;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR call on all levels of government in Canada to:

  1. Work to expand fair access to institutions and opportunities;
  2. Promote economic equity and justice;
  3. Seek investments in opportunity and advancement;
  4. Work to ensure that racial equity and racial justice efforts are adequately funded and effectively resourced.

Medical Inadmissibility

Resolution number: 
2
June 2016
Whereas: 
  1. Permanent residence applications are often refused by IRCC for reasons of medical inadmissibility;
  2. Those refused include applicants with family members with disabilities;
  3. A disability is not a health condition,
  4.  A disability is one of the grounds with Charter protection; 
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR:

  1. Take the position that people with disabilities should not be inadmissible for health grounds;
  2. Call upon IRCC to review Section 38 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and the procedures and guidelines of medical inadmissibility for discriminatory content against persons with disabilities.
Subject: 

Truth and Reconciliation Commission Call to Action

Resolution number: 
1
June 2016
Whereas: 
  1. Newcomers to Canada like all Canadian residents are treaty peoples;
  2. The federal, provincial and territorial governments have a responsibility to make newcomers aware of treaties and the history of residential schools, and support their full participation as treaty peoples;
  3. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) of Canada issued 94 Calls to Action to federal, provincial, territorial and Aboriginal governments in its final report in December;
  4. TRC Calls to Action #93 and #94 specifically charge the federal government with providing a “more inclusive history of diverse Aboriginal peoples in Canada, including information about the Treaties and history of residential schools” and revising the Citizenship Oath to include swearing to “faithfully observe the laws of Canada including Treaties with Indigenous Peoples”;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR:

  1. Call on federal, provincial and territorial governments to:
    1. Move quickly to allow newcomers to understand and affirm the treaty relationship by implementing Calls to Action #93 and #94;
    2. Develop strategies in consultation with Aboriginal governments to ensure their implementation, and provide resources‎;  
  2. Call on federal, provincial, territorial and Aboriginal governments to implement in a timely manner all the other TRC Calls to Action 

Islamophobia and discrimination targeting newcomer youth

Resolution number: 
1
May 2015
Whereas: 
  1. Islamophobia and racist discrimination that disproportionately target newcomer youth are growing;
  2. This discrimination is being amplified by new and existing federal legislation; 
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR:

  1. Calls on the federal  and provincial governments to increase funding for newcomer youth services, and where applicable reverse recent funding cuts to these areas;
  2. Recognizes and promotes to member organizations youth engagement and youth-led programming, including by holding regular youth-directed information sessions and workshops to identify emerging issues and appropriate responses.
  3. Encourages members to respond to potentially harmful legislation and draw attention to the particular impacts on youth.
Subject: 

Settlement Renewal

Resolution number: 
2
November 1995
Whereas: 
  1. Settlement Renewal will have significant implications for settlement and integration services in Canada;
  2. A consultation on national principles was held at the CCR fall consultation with a broad participation including representatives from different provinces across Canada;
  3. A series of principles were generated.  A principle is defined as a commonly held, value-based guideline or framework that guides action;
  4. Consultation participants have expressed a need for further opportunities to provide a fuller input on the Settlement Renewal consultation;
  5. This consultation process on Settlement Renewal should be transparent, structured and inclusive with adequate federal funding;
Therefore be it resolved: 
  1. The settlement core group on behalf of the settlement working group:

*  monitor the Settlement Renewal process;

* further develop these principles and draft others which address gaps in the current set;

* develop standards which relate to these principles;

  1. The CCR forward this document immediately, followed by any subsequent principles and standards, to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration for inclusion in the legal agreements between the Federal Government and partners as determined through the Settlement Renewal process;
  2. The CCR communicate these principles to all the participants of the Settlement Renewal workshop.

NATIONAL PRINCIPLES

National principles must be upheld by national standards.  These standards still need to be developed along with mechanisms which ensure compliance.

1.   Client eligibility

a) Settlement/integration services should be available to immigrants/refugees based on need rather than on immigration status or length of time in Canada;

2.   Eligibility of Service Deliverers:

b) Services which are mandated by provincial, regional, or local governments (health care, primary‑secondary education, administration of justice) should not be funded as settlement and integration services;

c) Not‑for‑profit, community‑based organizations with proven track records, and a primary mandate in delivering settlement/integration services should be given funding priority;

d) Service-providers should have expertise and skills in the field of settlement and integration;

3.   Rights of clients:

e) Providers of settlement and integration services must respect and protect fundamental rights of clients (eg. confidentiality, legal, etc.);

f) Services should be delivered in a manner that is culturally and linguistically appropriate and free from racism and other forms of discrimination;

g) Organizations collecting and using data must meet standards of appropriateness, confidentiality, validity, etc. and must be accountable to the clients whose information is being collected;

4.   Comprehensiveness of services:

h) Where appropriate and practical, clients should be able to choose from among service-providers the approach to service-delivery that best meets their needs;

i) Settlement/integration services should:

-  meet national standards,

-  reflect changing needs of the local community,

-  meet the self-defined needs of the individual immigrant/refugee;

5.   Accessibility of services

j) Services should be made accessible by identifying and removing systemic barriers;

6.   Priority-setting and funding allocation process

k)Where established, local or regional advisory bodies should identify local settlement and integration priorities.  These non-partisan bodies should be composed of community members with expertise in the provision of settlement services and reflect the ethno-racial composition of the client group;

7.   Humanitarian Obligations

l)Settlement Renewal should not reduce the federal government's national obligations to international responsibility-sharing and offering a safe haven to refugees.  The rights and needs of refugees must be integrated and guaranteed priority in the provision of settlement and integration services;

8.   Accountability

m) Allocation of settlement funds should be utilized solely for settlement/integration services;

n) Methods for ensuring accountability should be appropriate, realistic and cost effective. They should:

-reflect accountability methods already in place;

-not constitute "undue scrutiny" in comparison with practices for other comparable service sectors;

9.   Enduring Federal Role

o) A strong federal role must include a commitment to continue to fund settlement services at a rate not less than the 1994/95 funding level.

CIC documents for Trans Persons

Resolution number: 
6
November 2014
Whereas: 
  1. Gender identity is a fluid concept;
  2. Refugees may be persecuted because of their gender identity;
  3. Migrants’ gender identity may change before and after they arrive in Canada;
  4. Trans newcomers to Canada experience barriers in obtaining government documents which reflect their gender identity;
  5. CIC policies state that its documents cannot be changed to reflect persons’ lived gender identity;
  6. Provincial and Territorial Human Rights Codes protect the right to gender identity and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms prohibits discrimination; 
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR demand amendments to CIC policies such that immigration and citizenship documents reflect the gender of persons as they identify.

2014 Protocol to the Forced Labour Convention

Resolution number: 
5
November 2014
Whereas: 
  1. The General Conference of the International Labour Organization (ILO) adopted a new protocol to the Forced Labour Convention in June 2014 in order to address gaps in the implementation of the Convention, and to protect vulnerable workers from abuse;
  2. Canadian labour laws fail to adequately protect migrant workers, leaving them at risk of abuse, conditions of forced or compulsory labour, exploitation and human trafficking; this is a growing yet preventable problem;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR call upon the government of Canada to ratify the 2014 Protocol to the Forced Labour Convention, and to implement all of its provisions.

Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women

Resolution number: 
4
November 2014
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR is committed to ensuring protection for all persons experiencing gender based violence;
  2. There are more than 1,000 missing and murdered First Nations, Inuit and Metis women and girls;
  3. First Nations, Inuit and Metis women and girls experience high levels of violence throughout Canada;
  4. The affected communities are calling for a national inquiry;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR call on the Canadian government to:

  1. Commit to and implement a National Action Plan that addresses the discrimination and inequalities facing Aboriginal women and girls.
  2. Establish a national inquiry to ensure this action plan is well informed and accountable.

Extending labour protections to all workers

Resolution number: 
3
November 2014
Whereas: 
  1. In Canada, some workers are excluded from labour protections such as labour standards and workers compensation, health and safety protections and effective anti-reprisals protections, based on their immigration status;
  2. Some jurisdictions in Canada explicitly exclude categories of workers such as domestic workers and agricultural workers, who are disproportionately migrant workers; 
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR advocate that all workers regardless of status in Canada and of type of work have access to the full range of labour rights and protections, including provincial labour and employment standards, health and safety standards, and workers compensation.

Subject: 

Right to unionize and to bargain collectively

Resolution number: 
2
November 2014
Whereas: 
  1. The freedom of association and the right to collective bargaining are internationally recognized as fundamental principles and rights in the workplace;
  2. Some jurisdictions in Canada effectively prevent workers from unionizing or collectively bargaining based on their immigration status or sector of employment;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR advocate that all workers, regardless of sector of employment or immigration status in Canada, have the right to unionize and to bargain collectively.

Subject: 

Expanding economic immigration to workers of all skill levels

Resolution number: 
1
November 2014
Whereas: 
  1. The rampant expansion and continuous demand for the low-skilled (now low-wage) streams of the Temporary Foreign Workers Program (TFWP) make it clear that the labour shortages being filled are long-term and not temporary;
  2. The 2011 rule limiting migrant workers in the low-wage stream of the TFWP (previously known as the low-skilled pilot project) to four years of work in Canada, was intended to reinforce the temporary nature of the program, despite the continuing nature of the demand;
  3. The above time limits, which only apply to workers in the low-wage stream, exacerbate existing vulnerabilities;
  4. Canada’s traditional immigration approach was focused on nation-building through permanent immigration that met the broad range of labour needs across the Canadian economy; all workers were part of the national project;
  5. Canada’s shift towards temporary labour migration promotes a two-tiered, stratified society;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR call for Canada’s economic immigration program to be expanded to reflect the broad social, cultural, linguistic and environmental needs of the Canadian labour market by including workers of all skill levels.

Subject: 

Documentation on training resources

Resolution number: 
6
November 1993
Whereas: 
  1. 1.Training is an essential ingredient for the delivery of quality immigrant and refugee services;
  2. There is no centralized or comprehensive documentation of models and resources, although training opportunities and resources exist in some areas of Canada;
  3. The CCR has identified the area of settlement training as a specific focus for the 1994 Spring Consultation;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR gather and document information on the current settlement training opportunities and resources available across Canada which could be used as a resource tool for conference workshops.

Training for tomorrow

Resolution number: 
5
November 1993
Whereas: 
  1. The intent of training is to improve the quality and accessibility of settlement service delivery for immigrants and refugees by improving the skills of settlement workers;
  2. The demand for training in all regions of the country is increasing;
  3. Training programs do not exist in most parts of the country, and where they do exist they are underfunded;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR play a leading role in advocating to the federal government for the expansion of existing and the creation of new funding programs for settlement training.

Access to services for all

Resolution number: 
4
November 1993
Whereas: 
  1. 1.Refugee claimants come to Canada seeking refuge from persecution;
  2. Refugee claimants have the same needs of shelter, income and employment, education, health and entertainment as all other people;
  3. The World Health Organization and Health and Welfare Canada agree that the fundamental condition for good health are peace, shelter, education, food, income, a stable eco-system, sustainable resources, social justice and equity;
  4. Canada has signed the United Nations Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR advocate to the Minister of Immigration and Citizenship and the Provincial Premiers for:

  1. The equality with Canadian citizens of access to health, education, shelter and social services for refugee claimants;
  2. The guarantee of the provisions and access to rights and freedoms as outlined in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms to all persons in Canada regardless of their citizenship or status.

Health services

Resolution number: 
3
November 1993
Whereas: 
  1. Refugee claimants come to Canada seeking refuge from persecution;
  2. The psychological and physical health needs of refugees have been documented to be significant;
  3. Health has been defined by the World Health Organization and Health and Welfare Canada to be a state of complete physical, mental and social well being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity and a fundamental human right;
  4. Health has been singled out by the United Nations Committee on Social and Cultural Rights as the most important priority under the Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights which Canada has ratified;
  5. Everyone under Canadian jurisdiction and remaining in Canada for completion of federal processing is in the care and protection of the Federal Government;
  6. The Federal Minister of Health recognises the emergency health needs of refugee claimants;
  7. Doctors are required under the medical ethics to provide health services to all in need;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That:

  1. The CCR urge the Federal Minister of Health to work with the provincial Ministers of Health to find an effective way to deliver equitable health services to all people living in Canada including refugee claimants;
  2. The CCR contact the Canadian Medical Association and the provincial Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons and other professional health organizations to obtain policy positions on the insurance of health services delivery to ALL those requiring medical intervention;
  3. The CCR advocate that the Federal Minister of Health, in consultation with the CCR, strike a committee to advise federal and provincial ministers of health on the equitable delivery of health services and that members of this committee come from immigrant-serving NGO's, the Federal and Provincial Ministries of Health and Health Professionals.

Government-assisted refugee levels

Resolution number: 
2
November 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The government of Canada continues not to meet the announced levels for government-assisted refugees;
  2. Sufficient funds must be allocated to the AAP program in order to meet announced levels;
  3. Accepted refugees in Canada have been separated from their immediate families at risk abroad;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR Executive meet with the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration to request that:

  1. The level for government-assisted refugees be restored to 13,000 and that this level be met;
  2. The AAP Program be provided with sufficient funds to ensure that the level can be met;
  3. To meet the 1993 level, the immediate families of accepted refugees already in Canada and those landed under the backlog be resettled immediately, whether or not they are in the family class.
  4. When levels are not met by the end of the year, the balance of the quota be carried through to the following year and be added on to that year's level.

Citizenship

Resolution number: 
2
May 2014
Whereas: 

Citizenship is fundamental to who we are as a country;

Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR take the position that citizenship laws and policies must:

  1. Respect the principle that all citizens are equal.
  2. Embrace newcomers and encourage them to quickly become full participating members of our society.
  3. Recognize the barriers that some newcomers face to full participation, including the particular barriers faced by refugees who have suffered persecution and long years of deprivation.
  4. Respect the principle that citizenship is a status from which rights derive, and is thus similar to our status as human beings. It is not something that can be lost through behaviour.
  5. Have clear and transparent criteria about acquisition and loss of citizenship.
  6. Ensure that individuals have access to a fair hearing before an independent decision-maker, with the right of appeal. Decisions should not be made on a discretionary basis by the Minister.
Subject: 

Treaties

Resolution number: 
1
May 2014
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR resolved in November 2013 to honour all the Treaties upon which this country is founded and which bind all of us as treaty peoples;
  2. Newcomers to Canada enter into that treaty relationship when they become resident in this country;
  3. The State does not make newcomers aware of their treaty responsibilities;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR call on the government of Canada to redress this gap by ensuring newcomers are made aware of their role and responsibilities as treaty peoples by using vehicles, such as:

  • a mandatory component of the LINC/CLIC curriculum;
  • comprehensive treaty information in the newcomers guide by CIC, “Welcome to Canada: What you should know”;
  • comprehensive treaty information in the citizenship study guide by CIC, “Discover Canada: The rights and responsibilities of citizenship”;
  • amending the Canadian citizenship oath to include commitment to uphold treaties with First Peoples.

LINC

Resolution number: 
14
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. Many organizations receive inadequate funding for the administrative costs of delivering the LINC Programme;
  2. The contribution of volunteers greatly enhances LINC service delivery, but funding is not provided for volunteer recognition;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR Settlement Working Group meet with Danielle Racette, LINC Implementation Team Director, Citizenship and Immigration, to discuss these issues and develop a fair and equitable manner to recover administrative and volunteer costs associated with the Programme.

Collaborative funding efforts

Resolution number: 
13
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. Under the current era of fiscal restraint and funding cutbacks, agencies are being encouraged to enter into collaborative efforts for service delivery;
  2. The criteria for establishing collaborative efforts has been only loosely developed;
  3. The attempt to forge effective, equitable collaborative efforts has met with little, if any, success;
  4. The funding allocated to conjoint projects is never adequate to allow organizations to engage in a process of development;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Bring to the attention of funders, particularly the federal government and specifically the funders participating in the Culturally Appropriate Social Services Conference in Montreal, June 5 - 7, the need to allocate sufficient funds for the development process of forging equitable collaborative efforts between mainstream and community-based organizations including, but not limited to, the criteria for equitable power-sharing;
  2. Call upon the mainstream organizations to join in the effort of making the development process a reality for forging meaningful, equitable collaborative efforts.

Funding for administrative support

Resolution number: 
12
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. Settlement service agencies are encouraged to participate in special funding projects of their respective funders;
  2. Funders continue to expect settlement service agencies to provide administrative support costs and other internal resources such as staff time out of their core budgets
  3. This potentiality inhibits settlement agencies from accessing various funding programmes due to decreasing internal resources;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR bring to the attention of funders the need to recognize and provide administrative support costs to their funding programmes.

Settlement worker recognition

Resolution number: 
11
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. Settlement workers provide essential services in providing support during transition and adaptation of immigrants and refugees;
  2. Settlement workers have immense linguistic, cultural and crosscultural skills that are in demand by both the host community and immigrants and refugees;
  3. The majority of settlement workers are immigrants, visible minorities and women;
  4. Two of the four priority groups as identified by the federal government's employment equity plan are visible minorities and women;
  5. The ISAP contracts provided by the Department of Immigration to settlement agencies refuse to acknowledge and/or provide funding for any benefits except those mandated by law (i.e. CPP and UIC);
  6. Settlement agencies are independent and should not be subject to government wage freezes;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR write to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration urging him to fully recognize Settlement Worker skills by providing funds to allow settlement agencies to implement an adequate salary structure and benefit package including health and retirement plans.

Research

Resolution number: 
10
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. Community-based organizations across the country engage in research activities around the issues of immigrant and refugee services;
  2. There is a severe lack in funding these research activities at the grass roots level;
  3. Funders usually contract out research on immigrant and refugee services delivery to private consultants and academics;
  4. Research results are in consequence inadequate and not pertinent to the real needs of immigrant/refugee and ethnocultural communities across Canada;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Call upon all funders and particularly the federal government to recognize the value of research activities carried out by community-based immigrant and refugee organizations;
  2. Call upon all funders and particularly the federal government to provide financial resources for community-based organizations to continue to improve and expand research activities on immigrant/refugee service delivery;
  3. Continue to provide at the semiannual consultation a forum for community-based organizations to present the results of and exchange information on the various research activities across the different regions.

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