Immigration and Settlement

Contributions of refugees and immigrants

Resolution number: 
3
November 1996
Whereas: 
  1. The federal government has recognized the need to build welcoming communities as an integral component of successful settlement.
  2. The CCR has repeatedly (resolution 7, June 94; resolution 3, Nov. 94 and resolution 20, May 95) called upon the government to address the increasing backlash against refugees and immigrants.
  3. The media plays a determining role in shaping public opinion.
  4. There has been no significant proactive leadership role on the part of the federal government in highlighting the contributions of immigrants and refugees, and the role of settlement agencies through the mass media.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Call on the federal government to launch a large-scale, proactive mass media campaign to promote the contributions of refugees and immigrants.
  2. Urge that this campaign include significant input from refugee, immigrant and settlement communities and their advocacy agencies.

Systemic racism in refugee and immigration, services, policies and structures in Canada

Resolution number: 
2
November 1996
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR recognizes that racism is systemic in Canadian society and its institutions and that organizations committed to social justice must encourage structures that promote anti-racism.
  2. The Canadian government department of Multiculturalism and the Status of Women launched the Canadian Race Relations Foundation in recognition of injustices suffered by Japanese Canadians during the Second World War (Japanese-Canadian Redress Agreement) including the Japanese-Canadian head tax; this foundation has a mandate to do work on eliminating all forms of racism and all forms of racial discrimination in Canada.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Call on the chair of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation to appoint a Task Force to examine refugee and immigration services, policies and structures in Canada for systemic racism.
  2. Call on the chair of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation to ensure that such a Task Force include refugees, immigrants, refugee and immigrant advocacy organizations and experts in systemic racism in Canada.
Subject: 

Women at risk

Resolution number: 
4
June 1997
Whereas: 
  1. The actions of the Taliban army of Afghanistan have once again made the world aware of the unique risks faced by women;
  2. The Government of Canada prides itself on its guidelines on gender persecution;
  3. The number of women accepted by Canada as victims of gender persecution under the Women At Risk Program is disproportionately small in comparison to the enormous numbers of women refugees;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Obtain comparative statistics from the UNHCR on admissions under the Women At Risk Program in Canada and other nations;
  2. Write to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration and the Ministre des Relations avec les citoyens et de l'Immigration du Québec requesting an increased commitment to resettle Women at Risk and that this be reflected in the Canadian and Québec Annual Levels Plans for 1998 and following years, which plans should include an implementation plan;
  3. Express concerns regarding the Women At Risk Program in its submission to the UNHCR Formal Consultation on Resettlement and request follow up from UNHCR and government participants.
  4. Request the UNHCR and CIC to establish a Working Group together with NGOs (both settlement and sponsoring) to improve the Women at Risk program. Settlement/Overseas Protection

Blood donation

Resolution number: 
3
June 1997
Whereas: 
  1. The Canadian Red Cross has presented its programs at CCR meetings;
  2. The policy of not allowing blood collection from non-English or French speakers may resolve practical issues of informed consent, but has the effect of singling out and demeaning residents of Canada who do not speak either French or English;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Write to the Canadian Red Cross and express the CCR's concerns;
  2. Demand that the Canadian Red Cross renounce the exclusion of non-French and English speakers from the blood donor program and take immediate steps to allow for participation of all residents of Canada in the program.

Family reunification

Resolution number: 
1
June 1997
Whereas: 
  1. The Canadian Immigration Act and the Québec immigration law state that family reunification is a central objective of the Canadian and Québec immigration programs;
  2. Canada has signed and ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the American Declaration on the Rights and Duties of Man, all of which affirm the principle of family unity and that the family is entitled to protection by society and the state;
  3. The CCR has published an extensive report on family reunification and has passed various resolutions calling for the elimination of barriers to family reunification;
  4. The federal government continues to make changes in the Family Class regulations which serve to create further delays and barriers to reunification (i.e.. recent changes announced on March 18, 1997) and the Québec government has tightened the financial requirements for sponsors and has recently implemented a repayment program for defaulting sponsors without regard to their present financial situation;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR call on the Government of Canada to:

  1. Repeal the amendments of March 18, 1997 to the Family Sponsorship regulations;
  2. Initiate a process of consultative meetings with the CCR and concerned communities to revise the Family Sponsorship Regulations in a manner consistent with Canada's international human rights obligations;
  3. Recognize both in legislation and in policy implementation that family unity is the cornerstone of healthy and effective settlement for refugees and immigrants;
  4. Ensure that legislation, policy and regulations consider the importance of family unity on the successful settlement and long-term contribution of vulnerable groups such as survivors of torture and trauma, women at risk, and others who come to Canada under humanitarian programs;

AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the CCR call on the Government of Québec to review, in collaboration with the settlement agencies, its policy on defaulting sponsors to ensure that standards of fairness and equity are maintained in all situations.

AAP allocations for blended sponsorship programs

Resolution number: 
4
November 1997
Whereas: 
  1. The Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada has undertaken a consultative process with relevant stakeholders with a view to developing sponsorship programs that will include partnerships and blended roles and responsibilities;
  2. In some regions, as of April 1st 1998, the AAP/RAP allocations will be limited to the major urban centres in each region thus excluding the possibility of blended programs in smaller urban centres and rural communities where AAP/RAP will no longer be administered;
  3. A significant portion of current and past blended programs such as the Joint Assistance Sponsorship Program, the Women at Risk Program and the Special 3/9 Program for refugees from the former Yugoslavia have been undertaken successfully in smaller urban centres and rural communities;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR urge CIC to seek ways to ensure that AAP/RAP allocations are made available and can be administered in all communities where sponsorship groups wish to assist refugees to resettle under Joint Assistance Programs and other blended programs.

Suggested changes from AAP to RAP

Resolution number: 
3
November 1997
Whereas: 
  1. Agencies experienced in providing AAP services are the most knowledgeable as to how to meet client needs;
  2. Inclusive, integrated, and related services should not be arbitrarily limited or required (e.g. number of hours, weeks or service) but should be discretionary and based on client need;
  3. Services must include, but not be limited to, finding of permanent accommodation and sufficient funding to provide initial temporary accommodation and counselling;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR urge that:

  1. Government funding for AAP services be based on delivery of needed services without arbitrary parameters and funding be contracted on a "Global" basis for agreed services;
  2. Meaningful dialogue and consultation between service delivery NGOs and CIC take place before final approval of RAP regulations.

Allocation of additional settlement funds

Resolution number: 
2
November 1997
Whereas: 
  1. The federal government has allocated additional dollars for settlement in various provinces over a three year period;
  2. This money has not been spent on settlement services in some provinces;
  3. The need to spend significant amounts of settlement funds in a short time period will not facilitate the most effective use of such dollars;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Request these dollars be used in all provinces for the purposes for which they were released, i.e. settlement services;
  2. Contact the Minister of Immigration to urge her to request that Treasury Board regulations be relaxed to allow the settlement funds allocated for 1997/98 fiscal year as a surplus to be spent on 1998/99 fiscal year.

Children's education

Resolution number: 
1
November 1997
Whereas: 
  1. Canada is a signatory to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child which guarantees education for children;
  2. Education is fundamental to child development;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Adopt the policy that education is a right of all minors regardless of immigration status;
  2. Write to appropriate Provincial Ministers of Education urging that they adopt the above policy, and, for those provinces where this is already required by law, urging that they comply with their own legislation;
  3. Write to CIC urging that in the interim letters of no objection be issued to the children of refugee claimants without delay prior to determination of eligibility.

Resettlement Assistance Program

Resolution number: 
5
May 1998
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR adopted Resolution 3 in November 1997 concerning changes from AAP to RAP and has not received a satisfactory response;
  2. There has been no consultation about the changes to services with the organizations that deliver the services, let alone with the refugees receiving the services;
  3. CIC is committed to promoting through its services greater independence in government-assisted refugees;
  4. CIC is continuing to impose a quantitative approach (defining the numbers of hours of service to be delivered, and the period within which they are to be delivered);
  5. The changes appear to mean, at least in some regions, significant cutbacks in services for government-assisted refugees;
  6. In some areas the role of reception centres is being called into question, but without open discussion and consultation;
  7. Citizenship and Immigration Canada is developing national standards for services to arriving refugees, again without consultations;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Reaffirm its call for RAP services to be contracted on a "global" basis - both temporary accommodation and services -  while maintaining the financial contribution to existing reception centres at the 1997-98 level;
  2. Note that "independence" for resettled refugees is best achieved through timely, holistic, effective and appropriate services;
  3. Call on Citizenship and Immigration Canada i) to review the proposed RAP implementation and develop national standards, in consultation with NGOs delivering the services and with resettled refugees, and ii) to hold a national meeting for this consultation.

Settlement services to lesbians, gays, bisexuals and trans-gendered refugees and immigrants

Resolution number: 
4
May 1998
Whereas: 
  1. The Human Rights Code includes sexual orientation as one of the prohibited grounds for discrimination in Canada;
  2. Gay men, lesbians, bisexual and transgendered individuals are as much a part of the immigrant and refugee communities as they are part of every community;
  3. Settlement agencies have the responsibility to provide relevant, effective and appropriate services to these further marginalized immigrant and refugee communities;
  4. The staff of settlement agencies, as part of a society that has heterosexist privilege, may have internalized a world view that further marginalizes these groups;
  5. This will impact negatively on the ability of the sector to provide effective settlement services to gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered immigrants and refugees;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR play a proactive role in supporting the rights of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered immigrants and refugees by:

  1. a) Becoming familiar with the issues affecting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered immigrants and refugees, with the agencies providing specialized services to these communities, and with the immigration options available to them;

    b) Providing training opportunities at conferences for settlement staff to begin to challenge attitudes which discriminate against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered refugees and immigrants;

    c) Developing internal policies that affirm the rights of individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered immigrants and refugees;

    d) Applying inclusive hiring practices that encourage the employment of staff from these communities.

  2. Taking a proactive role in encouraging CCR member agencies to accept their responsibility to provide appropriate settlement services to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered immigrants and refugees by undertaking the same initiatives outlined above.

Settlement services to refugee claimants

Resolution number: 
3
May 1998
Whereas: 

There is a need to share information on services for refugee claimants and to explore how the work can be improved and better communication networks established across the country;

Therefore be it resolved: 

That the Executive of the CCR give priority consideration to establishing an ad hoc joint committee (Settlement/Protection) to deal with the issues of services to refugee claimants.

Gender analysis

Resolution number: 
2
May 1998
Whereas: 
  1. In many areas immigration policy affects men and women differently;
  2. There is no central coordination of gender analysis within the Immigration Department;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR call on CIC to establish a gender policy advisor.

Subject: 

Canadian passports

Resolution number: 
7
November 1998
Whereas: 
  1. All Canadian passport holders are equal regardless of country of origin;
  2. Canadian passport and travel document holders have suffered violations of their human rights by foreign governments at foreign ports of entry on the basis of their country of origin;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR call upon the Canadian government to ensure that foreign governments treat all Canadian citizens equally.

Access to higher education for refugees in limbo

Resolution number: 
6
November 1998
Whereas: 
  1. Convention refugees who have not been landed are living permanently in Canada;
  2. Access to higher education is a key to Canadian life and economic independence;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Write to the minister of Human Resources Development Canada urging him to amend the Canada Student Loans Act to include Convention Refugees in their eligibility criteria;
  2. Urge its members to raise this issue with their local Members of Parliament;
  3. Encourage provincial governments to:

    a) advocate this change with the Federal government;

    b) make the same change in their provincial legislation.

Subject: 

Civic participation

Resolution number: 
1
November 1998
Whereas: 
  1. Civic participation, including taking out citizenship, being aware of political issues and voting, is key to full participation in Canadian society;
  2. Political representation seems to be lagging behind demographic change;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR urge its members to:

  1. Actively encourage more civic participation by immigrants and refugees;
  2. Explore the development of programming to facilitate this goal.
Subject: 

Language funding in Ontario

Resolution number: 
5
November 1998
Whereas: 
  1. Acquisition of language is key to the educational process;
  2. Adequate language funding in the school system is important to the future success of immigrant and refugee children;
  3. Current Ontario government policy only allow for three years of language support from the time of arrival in Canada;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR write to the Ontario Ministry of Education urging that eligibility for funding for language support:

  1. be extended to at least five years;
  2. be measured relative to the students' arrival in the Ontario school system to allow for adequate support for Canadian born children who start school without English skills and to allow for secondary migration from Quebec.
Subject: 

Professional and trade qualifications

Resolution number: 
4
November 1998
Whereas: 
  1. Immigrants and refugees are coming to this country with qualifications and professional skills that are needed in Canada;
  2. Many newcomers have been denied access to their professions or trades because of inflexible accreditation bodies;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR call on the federal and provincial governments to ensure that there is a fair process whereby newcomers can gain recognition of the skills they acquired elsewhere and have:

  1. access to training to meet Canadian standards;
  2. a right of appeal from denial of such recognition or access.
Subject: 

Immigrant IMM 2000 cards

Resolution number: 
3
November 1998
Whereas: 
  1. There has been inadequate consultation with immigrants into their views on the proposed IMM 2000 card;
  2. The stated purpose is to prevent fraud which suggests that landed immigrants are perpetuating fraud;
  3. There will be costs to the landed immigrant over and above the discriminatory Right of Landing Fee (Head Tax);
  4. There are concerns about the information that will be able to be accessed by the IMM 2000 card;
  5. We believe that the use of biometrics is a violation of basic human rights;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR contact the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration and request consultations with the CCR and representatives of new Canadian communities before proceeding further with the IMM 2000.

Ontario settlement agencies

Resolution number: 
2
November 1998
Whereas: 
  1. The settlement agencies of Ontario have been living with uncertainty since the introduction of "Settlement Renewal" three years ago;
  2. The Ontario Government does not appear to want the responsibility of settlement;
  3. Clients' needs are best served by stable agencies which are focused on client service;
  4. Many of the practices of Ontario Region are inconsistent with the practices of other CIC regions;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Write to CIC National Headquarters asking that:

    a)The Federal Government cease active pursuit of negotiations on settlement renewal with the government of Ontario;

    b)CIC Ontario Region proceed as if settlement renewal will not go forward.

  2. Suggest that CIC improve their management of ISAP, Host and LINC contracts by:
    • Reducing the micro management of contracts, by, among other things, moving from monthly to quarterly reporting and by being more flexible and, at a minimum, implementing the ISAP Handbook which states that "you may shift funds from one cost category to another without prior approval";
    • Respecting agencies' difficulties with cashflow and interest charges by systematically making reasonable advances of funds;
    • Paying salary and administrative costs, including benefits, at a just level of remuneration across the country;
    • Seeking substantive agency input into all of the above.

Settlement in Canada of refugees from Kosovo

Resolution number: 
7
May 1999
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR has developed a position paper entitled Settlement in Canada of Refugees from Kosovo;
  2. The CCR is convinced of the need for communication, partnership, consultation, and co-ordinated response among all levels of government, sponsoring organizations and service providing organizations in a spirit of goodwill and common objectives;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR adopt the above-mentioned position paper and communicate it to Citizenship & Immigration Canada with the request that it be considered and its implications discussed with members of the CCR.

Canadian Council for Refugees POSITION PAPER

Subject: Settlement in Canada of Refugees from Kosovo

Goal: To resettle in destinations across Canada those refugees from Kosovo now located in government "sustainment sites".

Principles: For refugees from Kosovo, as for all refugees needing resettlement in Canada, the CCR believes in a focus upon what is best for each, including:

  1. Appropriate destining
  2. Orientation to Canada
  3. Orientation to community
  4. Opportunities for refugees to make choices
  5. Application of best settlement practices
  6. Varied and creative approaches to successful settlement
  7. Equity of services
  8. Interdependence of the service-providing infrastructure

    While recognizing that the following principles can have general application to the resettlement of all refugees, with particular relevance to the refugees from Kosovo now arriving under "Operation Parasol", the CCR believes in:

  9. The benefit of community involvement, and the opportunity to engender goodwill for these and other refugees
  10. The need for appropriate training and support of volunteers
  11. Access to the service-providing community's long experience
  12. The mutually supportive roles of Sponsorship Agreement Holders and Service Providing Organizations
  13. The commitment of both sponsoring and service providing organizations to "welcome the stranger", transcending and extending any contractual arrangements with government to provide sponsorship or services
  14. The responsibility of the Federal government to provide adequate resources so that the commitment and obligation of the responding community can be fulfilled to the best standards developed over the past twenty years
  15. The need for communication, partnership, consultation, and co-ordinated response among all levels of government, sponsoring organizations and service providing organizations in a spirit of goodwill and common objectives;

Urgent protection pilot project

Resolution number: 
6
May 1999
Whereas: 
  1. The implementation of the Women at Risk urgent protection pilot project has been repeatedly delayed;
  2. Women and children who are in immediate danger of persecution or physical violence can be identified;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR demand that implementation of the Urgent Protection Pilot Project proceed without further delay.

 

Metropolis: international and national research project on migration

Resolution number: 
5
May 1999
Whereas: 
  1. The fundamental value of the Metropolis project is to provide research results, which are rooted in reality, to assist governments in making policies;
  2. Community organizations serving immigrants and refugees have a role as legitimate and necessary partners along with academic researchers and government policy-makers;
  3. Community organizations serving immigrants and refugees can play an important role in connecting with immigrants and refugees, in identifying policy relevance and in articulating the concrete relevance of research to current and potential funders;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR write to the Metropolis Secretariat and all Canadian national Metropolis centres urging Metropolis to:

  1. Partner with the settlement sector in organizing a seminar highlighting research done by NGOs;
  2. Provide mechanisms to facilitate the development of a network of NGOs, including community organizations serving immigrants and refugees, from the participating Metropolis countries;
  3. Commit to helping community organizations serving immigrants and refugees participate by encouraging government and universities to provide funding for their meaningful participation, including national and international conferences;
  4. Develop an effective process for the three partners, that is, government, academics and community organizations serving immigrants and refugees, to translate research results to policy change, and from policy change to policy implementation;
  5. Enable newcomers themselves to be meaningful partners with government, academics and community organizations serving immigrants and refugees, and not just research subjects.
Subject: 

Outcome measures

Resolution number: 
4
May 1999
Whereas: 
  1. CIC hired a consulting firm to hold a small consultation on outcome measures for the LINC program and to produce a summary report;
  2. The consultation appears to have focused on managers and not included teachers and students;
  3. Outcome measures will likely have a significant effect on LINC contracts in the future;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That CCR urge CIC to:

  1. Distribute the report to all LINC providers to encourage wider input;
  2. Allow for consultation on recommended outcome measures before finalizing the measures;
  3. Be cognizant of the cost implications of outcome measurements for service providers;
  4. Commit themselves to a wide consultation on outcome measures for the ISAP and HOST programs.

Contracting relationship between CIC and settlement agencies

Resolution number: 
3
May 1999
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR notes with concern the deteriorating relationship between settlement agencies and CIC in some regions, brought about by micro-management;
  2. Settlement agencies are professional social services agencies dedicated to helping clients settle in Canada;
  3. Settlement agencies are committed to being accountable for funds;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That:

  1. The CCR urge CIC to review, in consultation with settlement agencies, the manner in which CIC contracts with agencies. The objective of this review is to establish accountability measures which promote the best possible services for clients and efficient, effective agency management;
  2. The review address, inter alia, the following specific issues occurring in some regions:

    (a) the independence of agencies and the fact that they are already subject to annual external audits;

    (b) the importance of client confidentiality;

    (c) the fact that rigid enforcement of ISAP eligibility rules undermines the ability of agencies to offer services in a welcoming and client centered manner (noting that CCR has resolved in November 1995 that services should be available on the basis of need);

    (d) the necessity of agencies to respect employment standards and human rights legislation as employers (particularly with regards to cuts which lead to layoffs and the practice of forcing agencies to lay off, on the basis of national origin, settlement workers, many of whom serve diverse clienteles);

    (e) the provision of reasonable and consistent administrative and overhead costs and the practice of insisting that agencies subsidize ISAP services through private fund-raising and funds from other institutional funders (an unrealistic maximum of 15% administrative costs is set in some regions);

    (f) the need for a reasonable balance between CIC's obligation to monitor funds, the administrative burden of reporting and the usefulness of information to be collected;

    (g) the use of three month contracts with long established partners, making it impossible to plan services, rent facilities and manage staff and causing agencies to devote a disproportionate amount of time to contract negotiation.

CIC eligibility criteria vis-à-vis refugee claimants

Resolution number: 
2
May 1999
Whereas: 
  1. Manitoba and British Columbia have recognized refugee claimants as legitimate recipients of settlement services;
  2. The CCR believes it is necessary to provide services to all newcomers to Canada, including refugee claimants;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR urge that:

  1. Refugee claimants be included in any and all funding formulas as legitimate recipients of settlement services throughout Canada;
  2. Additional funds be made available for settlement agencies to provide appropriate levels of services to this client group;
  3. The provinces that receive fewer numbers of refugee claimants not be financially penalized by this reality.

National settlement service standards

Resolution number: 
1
May 1999
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR has supported, in principle, the development of national settlement service standards as stated in the National Principles for settlement services (see Res. 2, Nov. 95, Res. 4, Jun. 96, and Res. 4, Nov. 96);
  2. The creation of a national settlement service standards steering committee during the November 1998 CCR conference has provided a mechanism to develop these standards and a draft framework and development strategy were presented during the May 1999 CCR conference;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR support the draft national settlement service standards framework and adopt the proposed development strategy.

 

Homelessness

Resolution number: 
4
December 1999
Whereas: 
  1. There is a national crisis of homelessness and lack of affordable housing;
  2. Immigrants, refugees and visible minorities face significant racism in the private housing market;
  3. In some large cities in Canada, newcomers make up a large portion of the shelter population;
  4. We deplore the "passing of the buck" by which different levels of government deny that newcomers' housing issues are their responsibility;
  5. Across the country income assistance rates are unrealistic in light of housing costs;
  6. There are many problems in accessing income support services across the country;
  7. We applaud the new southern Ontario project of issuing ID to assist claimants at port of entries in accessing services;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Write to the Federal Coordinator on Homelessness urging her to pay particular attention to the challenges facing homeless newcomers and especially newcomer families;
  2. Communicate with the Cooperative Housing Federation of Canada and join with them in calling on the federal and provincial governments to immediately start increasing the supply of social housing;
  3. Write to CIC urging that as part of the national strategy on homelessness:
    a) They implement information referral services at ports of entry to ensure that refugee claimants are not entering the homeless shelter system without appropriate resources to access the system and to ensure that a claimant's early months in Canada are the least traumatic possible and to ensure that they have an appropriate place to go when they leave the port of entry;
    b) They extend eligibility for ISAP services to refugee claimants;
  4. Write to provincial governments urging them to raise social assistance rates.
Subject: 

LINC

Resolution number: 
3
December 1999
Whereas: 

there are differences in the delivery of Settlement and language services in small communities (i.e. limited access to services, multi-level language classes, child care, transportation support) due to immigration patterns as well as regional disparities;

Therefore be it resolved: 

That CCR write to CIC to stress that:

  1. Services in small communities in Ontario should be based on regional realities of the province and should reflect the equality of services right across the regions of Ontario;
  2. Current LINC contracts be reviewed and evaluated in the light of de-committals;
  3. NGOs in rural areas be given special consideration to deliver high quality and equitable services;
  4. The criteria for the renewal of LINC contracts be based on clear pre-established criteria, not arbitrary criteria introduced after contracts are signed;
  5. CIC immediately begin a consultation discussion with community stakeholders before de-committals are implemented.

Funding settlement services

Resolution number: 
2
December 1999
Whereas: 
  1. Immigrants and refugees come to Canada with a wealth of experience and education;
  2. Recent studies have shown that it is taking longer for new arrivals to "catch up" to Canadian born individuals;
  3. There is a federal budget surplus;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR write to the Prime Minister and the Minister of Finance asking them to raise their level of investment in settlement services with the intention of raising the investment up to a level comparable to other support services.

 

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