CCR Resolutions Database

Search here for CCR resolutions. You can also consult resolutions by date of adoption.

Res.: 16 , Nov 2004
Whereas:
  1. PRRA is not a substitute for an appeal on the merits of the case;
  2. The PRRA process is dysfunctional and demonstrates a lack of respect for international human rights norms and for the Suresh decision of the Supreme Court of Canada;
  3. There is inconsistent application by PRRA decision-makers in the consideration of what constitutes sufficient evidence and expert evidence.
  4. There are insufficient guidelines for PRRA decision-makers with respect to how they are to evaluate evidence.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR:

  1. Call on CIC to develop guidelines on what constitutes “sufficient” evidence for the purposes of PRRA decision-makers.
  2. Call on CIC to develop guidelines on what constitutes expert evidence or testimony for PRRA decision-makers.
  3. Propose that CIC form a consultative committee with CCR, other NGOs and lawyers to analyze and make recommendations on the PRRA system.
  4. Ask the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration to study the overall effectiveness of the PRRA process in light of Canada’s international human rights obligations.
Res.: 4 , Nov 2004
Whereas:
  1. Workers on temporary work permits are not aware of their rights under the program and the charter;
  2. Many workers are not permitted by employers to retain their personal documentation such as passport, return air ticket and health card.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR demand that CIC and HRSDC:

  1. Ensure that temporary workers are fully informed of their rights under the program before or when they enter Canada;
  2. Ensure that temporary workers are given control of their own papers.
Res.: 9 , Nov 2004
Whereas:
  1. The violence and lawlessness in Iraq continues to escalate and the possibility of a peaceful solution does not seem imminent,
  2. Many Canadian families have been impacted by resulting tragedies,
  3. Relatives and friends and former neighbours of Canadians are fleeing Iraq for Syria, Jordan and Turkey on a daily basis,
  4. They feel compelled to flee because a member of their family has already been targeted and killed, because they have received death threats, because their children have been kidnapped and held for ransom or because of vendettas in the context of lawlessness,
  5. The UNHCR has suspended Refugee Status Determination for Iraqis and
  6. Those who have sought asylum in Turkey, Syria and Jordan are struggling to meet their basic needs because they left their belongings behind and they are not allowed to work.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR:

  1. Urgently request the UNHCR to immediately: i)    Resume refugee status determination for Iraqis in the region, ii)    Provide care and support for Iraqis who have sought asylum in these countries, iii)    Dialogue with resettlement countries including Canada to implement resettlement as a solution for Iraqis in the region,
  2. Urge the Government of Canada to immediately: i)    Dialogue with the UNHCR to facilitate the resettlement of Iraqi refugees through the Private Sponsorship Program as well as the Government Assisted Refugee Program, ii)    Increase staff in the Damascus Visa Post to accommodate the increased need for resettlement from the region and to expedite cases already in process.
Res.: 14 , Nov 2004
Whereas:
  1. PRRA and H&C applications are assessed by the same immigration officer in many cases;
  2. The grounds are to be considered under PRRA are different than H&C considerations.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR approach CIC to urge that H&C applications be assessed against the wider criteria of hardship, rather than risk as assessed in the PRRA.

Res.: 2 , Nov 2004
Whereas:
  1. The presence of family members is a strong indicator for successful settlement, and assists in small centre retention;
  2. The cancellation of the Assisted Relative category has greatly increased the pressure on the Private Sponsorship program.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR write to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration and the Ministre des Relations avec les citoyens et de l’Immigration requesting that the Assisted Relative class be reinstated.

Res.: 10 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. There is a long, 2-3 year backlog of privately sponsored refugee applications.
  2. CCR adopted Res. 13, May 02 on long processing times.
  3. All government-assisted refugees (GARs) are now referred by the UNHCR (other than in source countries) and CCR has repeatedly been told that there are limited visa office resources.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR urge CIC to simplify the overseas refugee determination process, and to eliminate the perennial backlog by not re-interviewing UNHCR referred GARs, and through temporary staff re-deployments.

Res.: 4 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. The government of Canada has repeatedly expressed concern for the under- employment of skilled newcomers.
  2. Many highly trained newcomers must work at survival jobs in order to support their families.
  3. People who work more than 20 hours a week are excluded from Employment Assistance programs funded by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC).
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR write to the Minister of HRSDC urging that under-employed newcomers be eligible for employment services regardless of the number of hours’ work per week if they are working outside of their sphere of expertise.

Res.: 9 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. The CCR adopted Resolution 5, Dec. 1999 drawing CIC’s attention to the inconsistency of interpretation of ‘durable solution’ and calling for an interpretation that specified that temporary protection and eligibility for future refugee determination do not constitute a ‘durable solution’.
  2. CIC’s manual chapter OP5 fails to provide clarity to the interpretation of ‘durable solution’, and continues to blend the concepts of ‘signatory countries’ and ‘fair and effective protection regimes’.
  3. The language used in OP5 does not conform to the regulatory provisions in IRPA.
  4. CIC created the policy in OP5 of ‘signatory countries’ as a limitation to access the Canadian resettlement stream even though IRPA provides no such limitation.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR:

  1. Urge CIC to abandon the use of concepts of ‘signatory countries’ and ‘fair and effective protection regimes’ and focus its attention on the availability of a durable solution for the individual applicant.
  2. Urge that OP5 be amended to conform to IRPA and to set out that there is no reasonable prospect of a durable solution in all those situations where it has been improperly applied, and in particular, those situations where: a)    a refugee claim has been made in the country where the person is located and rejected.

     

     b)    the determination of a refugee claim in the country where the person is located is subject to undue delays.

     

     c)    a refugee claim is pending in the country where the person is located and likely to be rejected for the reason that the concept of protection is applied more narrowly by that country than by Canada.

     

     d)    the person has been denied access to the local refugee determination regime because of the person’s own prior irrevocable waiver of the right to access the refugee determination system.
  3. Request that CIC:
    a) make it clear to sponsors and the applicant when CIC believes that applicants are in a country where local integration may represent a durable solution.
    b) indicate concretely what the proposed durable solution is.

     

     
    c) allow the sponsors and the applicant to rebut that presumption.
  4. Urge its members to litigate failed resettlement cases where ‘signatory country’ was the issue.
Res.: 5 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. CIC has recently recognized and supported the need for additional language training for skilled immigrants, as demonstrated by the Enhanced Language Training (ELT) funding.
  2. CIC has greatly increased the arrivals of high-needs, low Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB)scoring government-assisted refugees (GARs).
  3. Research and experience clearly demonstrate that very low CLB literacy scoring newcomers require substantial additional instruction and support.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR request CIC to:

  1. Increase the hours of LINC eligibility for low literacy clients.
  2. Provide additional supports for programming targeting such clients over and above standard ESL provisions in the same manner as that for skilled immigrants under the ELT stream.
Res.: 15 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. Essential principles of access to refugee protection, due process, and fundamental justice are increasingly under attack in Canada and in other refugee-receiving countries.
  2. The government has indicated that it intends to reform the refugee determination process in Canada.
Therefore be it resolved:

That:

  1. The draft Essential Principles, as amended by the Working Group on Inland Protection, be approved in principle as the present position of the CCR.
  2. The Executive of the CCR be empowered to revise and amend the draft Essential Principles, taking into account feedback from the membership, insofar as such revisions and amendments are in accord with the principles and policies of the CCR.
  3. The CCR publicize the Essential Principles and encourage its members to do likewise.
Res.: 20 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. In practice, Palestinian refugees are excluded from the mandate of the UNHCR in the host counties.
  2. UNRWA, unlike UNHCR, is not mandated to provide protection and security to Palestinian refugees under its administration.
  3. Palestinian refugees have lived without status or protection, often in refugee camps for over 56 years.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR call on the Canadian government to urge the re-examination of UNHCR ’s responsibility toward Palestinian refugees, suggested by the second paragraph of Article 1(d), the so-called “exclusion clause”, and include the second paragraph in their statutes as a basis for extending human rights protection and inclusivity, thus affirming the intention of the 1951 Refugee Convention.

Res.: 3 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. 75% of GARs currently arriving in Canada have special needs.
  2. Settlement agencies and sponsors are not equipped to respond to these special needs.
  3. These special needs include urgent medical needs.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR urge CIC and MRCI to:

  1. Recognize the extent of these special needs and reflect this in the training and resourcing of federally funded settlement service providers and those funded through provincial partnerships or programs.
  2. Together with other relevant federal departments, provincial counterparts and educational institutions training health care providers, to seek ways to address the training needs of health providers with respect to refugee trauma and torture and cross-cultural awareness.
  3. Review the current RAP allocation model and upgrade dollars and timeframes to better support these special needs.
Res.: 8 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. There have been long-standing difficulties in obtaining exit permits from Turkey for privately sponsored refugees.
  2. CIC has decided unilaterally to close all current private sponsorship files, including cases which have already been accepted by the visa post to come to Canada.
  3. The Sponsorship Agreement states that the Private Sponsorship of Refugees Program “is a symbiotic partnership between SAHs and CIC wherein each relies on the other to fulfill their responsibilities in order for the program to succeed” and “the partnership … provides a framework where SAHs may collaborate with CIC to respond to special measures … and emergency situations” (Principles b and g).
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR:

  1. Urge CIC to keep all current private sponsorship files in Turkey open until all avenues have been pursued and until such time as an agreement can be reached with the SAH representatives, and to lift the ban on new undertakings, pending a solution(s) to the exit permit issues.
  2. Urge the government of Canada to continue working with the Multilateral Technical Committee to find a solution(s) to the current and future Turkish exit permit issues.
  3. Urge CIC to respect the terms of the SAH agreement (Principles b and g) and work in full collaboration with elected SAH representatives in further negotiations.
  4. Urge UNHCR to take proactive steps to assist in facilitating the departure from Turkey of persons accepted by the Canadian visa post.
Res.: 13 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. The news about torture, murders and disappearance of prisoners in Iraq, Afghanistan and Guantanamo Bay by American and coalition forces has shocked the conscience of the world and has led to widespread reaction in the USA and elsewhere.
  2. An Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture, dealing with the mandate of the UN Committee against Torture to enter and monitor conditions in places of detention, has been adopted by the UN General Assembly and is ready for accession.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR write to the Prime Minister of Canada demanding that Canada:

  1. Make a public condemnation of torture in Iraq and Afghanistan by US and coalition forces, and ask for the US administration to:a) Adhere to the international legal instruments against torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. b) Train US military personnel and other enforcement official to adhere to these human rights standards. c) Allow outside inspection of US-controlled jails, detention centres and other facilities where persons are detained. d) Designate an independent ombudsperson to receive complains about torture and other human rights abuses.
  2. Accede to the UN Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and encourage other countries – including and especially the USA – to do the same.
Res.: 18 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. The current military occupation in the West Bank and Gaza Strip violates a plethora of international human rights conventions which Canada has ratified.
  2. Palestinians living under military occupation in the West Bank and Gaza Strip are facing a humanitarian disaster.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR call on the Canadian government to immediately place a moratorium on deportations to The Palestinian occupied territories, in recognition of the ongoing military occupation and the risk to the life, liberty and security of those living under it.

Res.: 1 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. CCR passed Resolution 19,Dec. 2000 on combating homophobia and heterosexism and Resolution 4, May1998 on the need to develop internal policies that affirm the rights of individuals.
  2. CCR should lead by example in combating homophobia and heterosexism in the CCR membership and the immigrant and refugee serving communities.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR:

  1. Develop an anti-homophobia and anti-heterosexism policy to present to its membership for endorsement at the Fall 2004 consultation.
  2. Ensure that this new policy and the existing anti-racism policy incorporate an integrated approach in implementation.
Res.: 6 , May 2004
Whereas:

The iCAMS system has been implemented across the country, and has proven to be a major burden to agencies, and cannot produce accurate and useful reports for either agencies or CIC.

Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR write to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration insisting that CIC:

  1. Dedicate the necessary resources to bring the iCAMS system up to modern standards, so that: a) it will support database to database transfers, and b) allow for local reports production.
  2. Adjust the data collection points in consultation with the sector to bring them in line with the Accountability Framework, and to make the system’s use less burdensome for agencies.
Res.: 11 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. The problems with the IFH program have been mounting.
  2. The IFH Advisory Committee has become inactive.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR urge Medical Services Branch to mobilize the IFH Advisory Committee to develop solutions to: a) registration problems b) the complex claim process c) the slow reimbursement scheme d) inadequate resources for increasing special needs.

Res.: 16 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. The Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations state that the Minister can suspend removals to a country or place where there is a situation of generalized risk.
  2. Where there is no functioning government, civilians are at generalized risk.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR call on the Canadian government to add countries that are without a functioning government, like Somalia, to the list of countries to which Canada has temporarily suspended removals.

Res.: 21 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. There is demonstrable confusion within IRB and PRRA regarding the status of stateless Palestinian refugees, and the conditions they have fled.
  2. This lack of understanding has led to inconsistent and ill-informed decision-making.
Therefore be it resolved:

That CCR, together with other organizations and coalitions working for the rights of Palestinian refugees, raise with the IRB and with PRRA officials the need for better and more consistent information regarding the legal status of Palestinian refugees and the rights violations they face.

Res.: 14 , May 2004
Whereas:

The government of Sudan is engaged in a policy of ethnic cleansing against the population of the Darfur region, as it has done in the past against other ethnic groups in the country.

Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR urge the Canadian government to:

  1. Send a strong protest to the government of Sudan condemning its deliberate policy of ethnic cleansing in Darfur region and requesting the government of Sudan to grant full and unhindered access to Darfur region by international organizations.
  2. Raise the issue of ethnic cleansing in Darfur at the UN Commission on Human Rights (UNCHR) and other international for a.
  3. Explore the possibility of joining in a fact finding trip to Darfur region.
Res.: 19 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. Palestinian refugee claimants from Lebanon have faced an inconsistent and uninformed decision making process which has resulted in the rejection of some deserving refugees claims.
  2. Registered and unregistered Palestinian refugees from Lebanon face systematic discrimination and human rights abuses.
  3. Palestinians may face persecution by non-state actors.
  4. The stateless Palestinian refugees in Lebanon, often in 56 year old refugee camps, are not accorded the host state’s protection, are denied any possibility of citizenship and receive no direct and inviolable international protection.
  5. Many of the Palestinian refugees from Lebanon have lived in Canada for over two years and in that time established themselves in Canadian society.  
  6. Resolution 12, Nov. 03 called for recourses in Canada for stateless persons.  
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR:

  1. Inform CIC of the well-documented evidence of systematic human rights violations, the recognition by certain IRB members of said violations as persecution and the inconsistent decision-making on Palestinian claims.
  2. Call on CIC to facilitate the H&C process, in light of the unique circumstances faced by stateless Palestinian refugees from Lebanon, to allow the refused refugee claimants to be granted permanent resident status in Canada.
  3. Call on CIC to collaborate with the Palestinian community in Canada to resolve the problems of ID requirements that may be faced by stateless Palestinian refugees.
Res.: 2 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. Communities are seeing many incidents where sponsored refugees are leaving newborn children behind.
  2. Some children are dying as a result of these decisions.
  3. These decisions are being made based on information circulating in-country that reporting these newborns will result in their travel arrangements being cancelled.
  4. Information on how to report and procedures for reporting do not always reflect the context of refugee applicants regarding access.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR urge CIC to:

  1. Develop a policy which clearly states that reporting newborn children will not jeopardize a family’s passage to Canada.
  2. Communicate this policy to all embassies and UNHCR requiring that this policy be broadcast throughout the refugee population.
  3. Distribute this policy to refugee support systems in Canada for dissemination in ethnocultural communities.
  4. Facilitate a variety of avenues in which to report newborn children and ensure that applicants receive such information.
Res.: 7 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. National Settlement Sector occupational competencies do not exist.
  2. No certification/accreditation body presently regulates settlement as a profession.
  3. Professionals in this sector provide services at par with other social service providers.
  4. There is an increasing burden on Settlement Practitioners to provide varied and in-depth services meeting provincial/federal reporting, evaluation and accountability requirements.  
  5. CIC has promoted the notion of comparable services across provinces and regions.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR, in collaboration with other sector organizations, seek funding from appropriate sources and contingent upon securing appropriate resources, undertake a feasibility study on Professional Certification within the settlement sector.

Res.: 12 , May 2004
Whereas:
  1. UNHCR recognizes voluntary repatriation as one of the three durable solutions and thus actively promotes it when and where conditions permit.
  2. These conditions must be not merely transient but fundamental such as the restoration and rehabilitation of infrastructure, restitution of land and lost property, and all other factors which make voluntary repatriation sustainable.
  3. It is crucial that refugees, including refugee women, have a say in all decisions and activities that affect them, including decisions and activities on voluntary repatriation.
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR ask the Government of Canada to urge UNHCR to insist as a matter of principle in its discussions and negotiations with host governments and governments of countries of origin that refugees, especially refugee women, be included as active partners in the negotiation, planning and implementation of all voluntary repatriation processes.

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