Inland Protection

Refugee awareness week and refugee rights day

Resolution number: 
36
June 1994
Whereas: 

The education of the Canadian public and promotion of rights and concerns relating to refugees are vitally important matters to those concerned with the plight of refugees;

Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Adopt the week in which April 4 falls each year as Refugee Awareness Week and April 4 as Refugee Rights Day;
  2. Recommend to its members the organization of programmes to promote greater understanding of the plight of refugees at this time each year.
Working Group: 

Detention

Resolution number: 
35
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR has produced a document entitled Refugee Detention in Canada, dated May 24, 1994, describing the current state of detention practices in Canada;
  2. The CCR and its member organizations have a collective experience of serious abuses and arbitrariness in arrest and detention practices since the adoption of law C-86;
  3. The practice of administrative detention under the Immigration Act violates article 9 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and several international human rights treaties that Canada has signed;
  4. The detention of people for removal in jails with common criminals or people being held for trial violates Canada's international obligations;
  5. There is an urgent need to reform the current rules and practices concerning grounds and powers of detention, including the necessity of legislative amendment, to prevent abuse of individuals' rights. Alternatives should be sought so that detention is used only when consistent with Charter of Rights and Freedom;
  6. Immigration officials at Canadian airports and entry points to Canada have greatly declined in civility and humanity in the treatment of visitors and foreign nationals seeking to come into this country since the adoption of Bill C-86;
  7. An exaggerated level of suspicion and scepticism is being shown to visitors to this country and this is harming the international image of this country;
  8. Minimal international standards for arrest and detention as well as conditions of detention have been adopted by the United Nations;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Endorse the May 1994 report on detention as its official paper on detention;
  2. Condemn the systematic violation of article 9 of the Canadian Charter and our international obligations;
  3. Urge the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration to establish clear rules consistent with the Charter to delineate grounds for detention;
  4. Urgently demand the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration to establish a mechanism for sanctions and accountability for immigration officials who abuse the rights of non-citizens and to study the possibility of an independent ombudsman for complaints about immigration practices;
  5. Demand that a code of ethics be established for immigration officials which stresses the need for normal courtesy and respect for physical conditions for visitors, as well as emphasizing a non-discriminatory attitude towards those coming to this country;
  6. Contact provincial tourism ministers to make them aware of the treatment that visitors to this country are subjected to at the current time;
  7. Invite the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention of the United Nations Human Rights Commission to visit Canada on a fact-finding visit to investigate the conformity of Canadian practices with international standards of behaviour;
  8. Advocate to the Minister that, while awaiting legislative amendments:
    1. Interpreters must be more quickly available at points of entry. No one should be detained simply because an interpreter cannot be found in time;
    2. A citizens advocates mechanism should be established in order to guard against abuse by self-contained administrative tribunals;
    3. The Department should facilitate access to review sessions to advocates willing to accompany detainees;
    4. A mechanism should be established for publishing and making available to counsel noteworthy decisions rendered by adjudicators;
    5. Maximum periods of detention should be established (no more than 4 months), except in cases where there is serious reason to believe the person poses a security risk or risk to the public. At the very least, the 4 month mark should trigger a special review with counsel, if necessary, funded by the federal government to actively seek solutions other than detention. A community advocate should also be present, if desired by the detainee;
    6. Detainees awaiting removal should be released, if the removal cannot be effected in the immediate future, as long as the person is not a security risk;
    7. Regulations establishing standards for detention centre conditions, rights and treatment of detainees and conditions for transfers to jail should be adopted. These regulations should be drawn up in consultation with the NGO sector;
    8. Detainees exhibiting signs of psychological stress should be given access to appropriate medical personnel immediately. Known or suspected survivors of torture should be referred to specialists. Reports of medical personnel should be taken into consideration in all decisions concerning the person's continued detention;
    9. Suicide attempts must be treated with the seriousness such an act merits. Relevant legislation should be reviewed and medical experts consulted to ensure that appropriate procedures are established and followed;
    10. Adequate medical care should be made available to all detainees in a timely manner. Special attention should be given to the medical needs of pregnant women;
    11. NGO's should be invited to participate in the training of personnel at detention centres, so as to increase sensitivity to the rights and needs of detainees;
    12. An independent review mechanism should be set up to oversee conditions of detention;
    13. In cases of detention in jails, detainees who have not been accused of a criminal offence should be separated from the general prison community. Special efforts should be made to expedite the case and to ensure that the detainee has access to counselling and community advocates;
    14. Minimum standards for outdoor exercise facilities should be established. There should be more than a small concrete courtyard;
    15. Airport detention facilities should be improved. Comfortable chairs should be provided. The specific needs of children should also be considered with special reference to the UN Convention on the Rights of Child. Food and drink should be made easily available;
    16. All detainees should be provided with an information sheet that clearly outlines their rights and obligations. The information sheet should be translated into as many languages as possible;
    17. All detainees should be provided with a list of organizations that might provide assistance;
    18. There should be opportunity for NGO representatives to meet with regional immigration officials at regular intervals;
    19. Staff cuts should not be made at the expense of the client. Staff needs should be regularly evaluated and reassignments immediately made if necessary;
    20. In seeking to increase the capacity of NGOs to anticipate and respond to the needs of incoming refugee claimants, the department should keep records of gender, age, and country of origin. These statistics would also permit the department to more effectively anticipate changes that might be required at detention facilities;
    21. Access to chaplaincy on a faith-appropriate basis should be provided.
Working Group: 

Drugging of deportees

Resolution number: 
34
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR has learned of a forcible drugging incident involving a pregnant woman deported to Zaire;
  2. Immigration officials have said that drugging has occurred in at least twelve cases of deportation last year;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR demand an independent inquiry into this incident and into the practice of medicating people for the purposes of deportation.

Working Group: 

Proposed IRB code of procedures for torture survivors

Resolution number: 
33
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR passed a resolution in May 1993 supporting the initiative of the National Network of Torture Survivor Centres to develop a code of procedures for the treatment of survivors who are refugee claimants;
  2. The CCR remains concerned about the plight of torture survivors in the refugee determination process;
  3. The CCR has been consulted in the preparation of the proposed code of procedures;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Endorse the proposed code of procedures for torture survivors;
  2. Assist the National Network in encouraging the IRB and the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration to study the code and to consult interested parties and to thereby formally create a legally enforceable code of procedures for the treatment of torture survivors.
Working Group: 

Code of conduct for the interpreters

Resolution number: 
32
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. A just refugee system requires that all players in the process, including interpreters, are held accountable;
  2. Interpreters are at present not held in any way accountable;
  3. There is no standard testing model for the purpose of accreditation and competence of interpreters and in many of languages there is not test at all. Different centres are allowed to recruit their interpreters using their own criteria;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR call upon the IRB to ensure that:

  1. There is coherence in the overall accreditation of the interpreters in all the languages;
  2. Interpreters are made accountable through licensing and be required to observe codes of conduct;
  3. Those previously recruited are made to take an updated test before certification.
Working Group: 

Rights of claimants during interim measures programme

Resolution number: 
31
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The Canadian Government has encouraged greater self-sufficiency of refugee claimants by authorizing work permits
  2. The Canadian Government has extended the residency period of many thousands of refugee claimants through new "interim measures";
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Ask the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration to instruct his department to grant work permits to refused refugee claimants eligible for the "interim measures" programme;
  2. Urge the Canadian Government to use its best efforts to ensure basic health care for refugee claimants awaiting processing through the "interim measures" programme;
  3. Urge the Minister to impose a moratorium on removals of all failed refugee claimants pending the outcome of the "interim measures programme".
Working Group: 

CCR involvement in interim review process

Resolution number: 
30
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration has, by News Release dated May 20, 1994, announced that his Department is establishing an "interim review process" to review negative decisions on refugee claims;
  2. The Minister has invited the CCR to assist in this "interim review process";
Therefore be it resolved: 

That:

  1. The CCR is interested in participating in the "interim review" of rejected refugee claimants announced by the Minister;
  2. CCR involvement must include full participation in designing the review process and establishing its criteria and would include representation at all working sessions of the Departmental planning body;
  3. All rejected claims, irrespective of date of rejection, be included in the review;
  4. If the CCR is adequately represented on a management committee to oversee administration of the review, the CCR recommend to its members that they circulate information on the review and that the CCR also encourage its members to assist eligible claimants in making appropriate submissions to the review process, on a non-exclusive basis.
Working Group: 

Moratorium on IRB appointments

Resolution number: 
29
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. There is broad national concern regarding the quality of appointments to the IRB;
  2. There is a need for independent evaluations of new nominees to the IRB;
  3. In the next few months a high percentage of IRB positions are scheduled to be filled or reappointed;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR request that the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration declare a moratorium on new IRB appointments until such time as independent review committees can be established.

Working Group: 

Principle of non-adversarial hearings at the IRB

Resolution number: 
28
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The IRB was originally designed in principle to be a non-adversarial adjudicative tribunal;
  2. The IRB has departed from this founding principle and has devolved into an adversarial process;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR strongly endorse the position contained in the Rebuilding Trust report by James Hathaway that the IRB return and adhere to the principle of being a non-adversarial tribunal of inquiry into Convention refugee claims.

Working Group: 

Follow-up to Davis/Waldman and Hathaway reports

Resolution number: 
27
June 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The report entitled Quality of Mercy by Susan Davis and Lorne Waldman recommends sweeping changes to the process of handling refugee claims;
  2. The report entitled Rebuilding Trust by James Hathaway recommends reforms to the selection, role and training of the people involved with the handling of refugee claims;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Request the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration and the Chairperson of the Immigration and Refugee Board to study the interaction of the above two reports and to prepare an implementation plan to co-ordinate the changes to be made as a result of these reports;
  2. Request that the CCR be made a full participant in the preparation of the above implementation plan;
  3. Undertake to develop by the end of September 1994 a common position on the essential principles from both of the above reports that it will advocate in discussions with the government and the IRB.
Working Group: 

Public inquiry into canadian military actions in Somalia

Resolution number: 
18
November 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR advocates on behalf of the human rights of refugees in Canada and abroad;
  2. Many clients of our constituent organizations are Somalis who have fled to Canada due to the torture and persecution they have suffered in their homeland at the hands of other Somalis;
  3. Canada's reputation as a country which respects human rights is the reason many refugees chose our country as a place of asylum;
  4. The CCR is therefore shocked that members of the Canadian military have been involved in the torture of a Somali youth, and that there are allegations of other serious abuses of Somalis by Canadian military personnel;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR strongly support a full public inquiry into the actions of the Canadian military in Somalia, as recently announced by the Minister of Defence, and urge the Canadian government to proceed with this inquiry as soon as possible.

Working Group: 

Public education on sexual minorities

Resolution number: 
17
November 1994
Whereas: 

The subjects of sexual minorities in general and refugee claims based on persecution on the grounds of sexual orientation are not discussed in the ethnic communities;

Therefore be it resolved: 

That the new anti-racism core group ensure that the issue of sexual minorities is placed on their agenda to do public education within the CCR membership.

Working Group: 

Guidelines and education on sexual orientation for the IRB

Resolution number: 
16
November 1994
Whereas: 

There are a number of refugee claims based on sexual orientation being rejected by the Immigration and Refugee Board for reasons that indicate prejudice at worst and a lack of knowledge at best;

Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR strongly urge the Immigration and Refugee Board to develop and adopt Guidelines for determination of claims of persecution on the basis of sexual orientation and provide on-going education on the Guidelines and on combatting homophobia to members, refugee hearings officers and interpreters.

Subject: 
Working Group: 

C - 44

Resolution number: 
15
November 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The Parliamentary Committee hearing submissions on Bill C-44 has requested the CCR to make a submission on alternatives to the provisions of that Bill;
  2. A submission has been prepared by David Matas which was presented to the Refugee Protection Working Group on November 25, 1994;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR Submission to the Parliamentary committee on C-44 written by David Matas be endorsed as CCR policy and forwarded to the said Parliamentary Committee. [See back page for synopsis of brief's recommendations.]

Working Group: 

Information on human rights of women in Iran

Resolution number: 
14
November 1994
Whereas: 
  1. There are reports coming out of Iran and resolutions of the Human Rights Committee of the United Nations about the Tehran regime's treatment of women;
  2. Due to the terrible situation of women and the barbaric tortures practised against political prisoners a catastrophic situation has been created forcing women's mass escape from Iran;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR write to the IRB expressing concern about the inadequacy of accurate and authentic information based on first-hand information, in particular the lack of sufficient information about up-to-date events in Iran and the true picture of the terrible situation of women in that country.

Working Group: 

IRB inquiry

Resolution number: 
13
November 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR is committed to seeking refugee policies and practices guided by principles of refugee protection. We believe in the importance of having people who have worked with refugee communities in positions of responsibility within the Immigration and Refugee Board;
  2. The CCR has developed a position on these matters entitled "Position on Essential Principles in Response to Hathaway and Davis/Waldman Reports" (September 1994);
  3. The CCR does not know the full details of the complaints made against Michael Schelew, nor of the process which led to his suspension;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR reaffirm the folllowing principles to which we are committed:

  1. The independence of Board members as decision-makers and of the IRB as a quasi-judicial tribunal.
  2. The need for a credible, transparent and accessible mechanism within the IRB for dealing with complaints.
  3. The need for an independent and impartial process for the appointment and reappointment of the members of the IRB.

We are furthermore deeply concerned with the barrage of media attacks on the refugee determination process. We are dismayed that no effort seems to have been made by the Minister's office to address the many distortions and inaccuracies contained in the various articles, when what is at stake may be the very principle of refugee protection.

Working Group: 

Convention on the rights of the child

Resolution number: 
12
November 1994
Whereas: 
  1. The Canadian Council of Churches and the Inter-Church Committee for Refugees have cooperated in the preparation of a brief submitted by ICCR to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child about non-citizen children;
  2. The CCR meets regularly with senior immigration officials;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR support the thrust of the Brief submitted by ICCR and raise the major recommendations of the Brief at its meeting with officials, namely:

  1. providing training programs on the Convention for the various actors in immigration procedures;
  2. allowing the children of non-citizens to benefit from the Canadian Human Rights Act as of right;
  3. introducing provisions of the Convention into the Immigration Act and Regulations relating to overseas procedures; children in hearings and interviews; family reunion procedures; and access to essential health and social services.
Working Group: 

Organizational renewal of C&I for improved service

Resolution number: 
11
November 1994
Whereas: 
  1. C&I has not met their own targets for processing claims, processing requests for permits or conducting reviews in a consistent or timely manner;
  2. There appears to be routine discrimination against people of colour within some parts of the Department, and there are regular reports of negative verbal comments against refugee or immigrant clients;
  3. The Department appears to have lost sight of the principle of client service, and its frontline employees are angry, confused and overwhelmed;
  4. C&I is likely to be the subject of continued resource reductions;
Therefore be it resolved: 
  1. The CCR communicate to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration the need for his commitment to a process of total organizational renewal of his Department with full involvement of stakeholders: Department management; employees and their representatives; and clients, including NGOs;
  2. In this context, the CCR ask that urgent attention be given to the Vegreville situation;
  3. As the CCR contribution to the Government Program review, the CCR communicate to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration all CCR resolutions with a cost-saving implication for the government.
Working Group: 

Privacy at the Federal Court

Resolution number: 
4
June 2012
Whereas: 
  1. Proceedings at the IRB involving refugees and refugee claimants are held in private by operation of law;
  2. Disclosure of information regarding refugees can place applicants, their family members and associates at risk;
  3. The information contained in judicial review records routinely includes protected private information;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR call on the Federal Court to adopt a practice of identifying refugee claimants by initials only and to take other appropriate measures to preserve confidentiality of private information for applicants seeking leave for judicial review of all immigration matters concerning risk to persons, including decisions by the Refugee Protection Division, Refugee Appeal Decision, the Immigration Division, and Minister’s delegates.

Working Group: 

Simplification of change of address

Resolution number: 
6
June 2012
Whereas: 

individuals with on-going processes with CIC, CBSA, and/or the IRB are required to provide separate address notification to each,

Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR advocate in favour of a centralized notification of change of address to avoid incidents of unnecessary detention and/or abandonment or dismissal of claims.

Subject: 
Working Group: 

Mental Health and Detention - part 3

Resolution number: 
5
June 2012
Whereas: 

individuals with mental health issues, who have had no involvement with the criminal justice system, are detained in provincial criminal institutions,

Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR advocate that CBSA cease this practice, provide individuals with accommodations that respect their dignity, and provide access to appropriate services.

Working Group: 

Mental Health and Detention - part 2

Resolution number: 
5
June 2012
Whereas: 

conditions imposed on individuals to be released from detention by the Immigration Division and conditions imposed for a stay of a deportation order by the Immigration Appeal Division do not always take into consideration difficulties of compliance for people with serious mental health issues.

Therefore be it resolved: 

that CCR advocate that the IRB develop a policy for decision makers that requires that all conditions of release and stay take into account the ability of the person to comply with the conditions in light of their mental health status.

Working Group: 

Mental Health and Detention - part 1

Resolution number: 
5
June 2012
Whereas: 

there are numerous gaps in services for immigrants and refugees with mental health issues and serious problems with the legal framework

Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR advocate in favour of:

  1. The right to State-funded counsel for persons with mental health issues.
  2. Access to mental health services for persons in detention, including assessment, counselling, and treatment.
  3. Training on mental health issues for all CBSA officers, IRB members, designated representatives and other stakeholders.
  4. Guidelines to provide for flexibility to enable PIF or BOC amendments without consequences for refugee claimants and
  5. Relaxed timelines for all vulnerable persons.
  6. Repeal IRPA sections 64 (2) (no appeal for a person with a sentence of 2 years or more) and 68 (a) (automatic termination of stays of removal in the event of subsequent conviction.
Working Group: 

Backlog Earned Regularization

Resolution number: 
3
June 2012
Whereas: 
  1. It is estimated that the backlog of refugee claims at the IRB will be approximately 38,000 at the time Bill C 31 comes into effect,
  2. This backlog will severely hamper the functioning of the new system,
  3. These individuals will be denied access to the Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA) and to consideration on Humanitarian and Compassionate grounds solely due to delays in processing their claims at the Immigration and Refugee Board, and
  4. Canada and other jurisdictions have implemented regularization programs to eliminate backlogs prior to changes in the refugee determination system
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR advocate for the establishment of an “earned regularization program” for refugee claimants whose claims have not been determined by the date of the coming into force of Bill C-31 and that participation in the program be voluntary and not result in the cancellation of the refugee protection claim.

Subject: 
Working Group: 

U.S.-Canada Memorandum of Understanding

Resolution number: 
23
May 1995
Whereas: 
  1. The U.S. standards for refugee protection are lower than those in Canada and the implementation of a safe country agreement will negatively affect thousands of refugee claimants coming to Canada from the U.S.;
  2. On February 25, 1995 Prime Minister Chrétien and President Clinton announced that they are seeking a Safe Country Agreement under the Joint Border Management Accord despite the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration's initial statements that he was against such an agreement;
  3. The CCR in previous resolutions has demanded significant guarantees before such an agreement is signed;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR:

  1. Press the government of Canada not to enter into agreement with the U.S. unless those guarantees are satisfied;
  2. Demand a public hearing on the new draft agreement before it is signed and seek opportunities to comment on the proposed agreement.
Working Group: 

Use of Restraints during IRB Hearings

Resolution number: 
22
May 1995
Whereas: 
  1. Refugee claimants not infrequently find themselves in detention even after they have been found eligible;
  2. All persons detained in an Immigration Holding Centre are routinely transported to and from hearings in handcuffs and those held in jail (detained under Immigration Act) are conveyed in handcuffs and leg irons;
  3. These restraints are in certain cases not removed even when a refugee claim is heard before the IRB;
  4. This seems to contradict the spirit in which a refugee claim is supposed to be made;
  5. The practice is a violation of UN standard minimum rules for the treatment of prisoners;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR ask the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration:

  1. To instruct Immigration enforcement officials that all restraints be removed before an IRB hearing;
  2. To ask the IRB to provide a reasonable and sufficient level of security so that restraints can be removed safely and in a way that the claimants are not compromised, the Board members remain without bias and a clear and fair refugee hearing can take place.
Subject: 
Working Group: 

DNA testing

Resolution number: 
16
May 1995
Whereas: 
  1. Citizenship and Immigration Canada through its foreign missions, is requesting a large number of families to submit to DNA testing as proof of relationships prior to approval for sponsorship;
  2. The DNA tests are being requested mainly for families from Third World countries;
  3. The DNA tests are very expensive, costing over $1200 for a family of two and more for large families, thus adding a further unbearable financial and emotional burden to families already struggling to raise money to pay processing fees, the Head Tax and transportation costs, and causing unacceptable delays in family re-unification;
  4. Current statistics show that over 90% of tests done to date have proved the families' relationships;
  5. The small number of negative test results cannot justify the financial burden imposed on others by widespread testing;
  6. Too much power is being wielded by the Canadian visa posts abroad in frequently requesting these tests when no reasonable grounds for doing so have been clearly established;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR:

  1. Call on CIC to stop the present discriminatory practice of requesting DNA testing from people from mainly Third World countries.
  2. Strongly urge the Minister to establish and publish clear guidelines as to what constitutes reasonable grounds of doubt which would justify a request for DNA testing.
Working Group: 

Appeal on the merits

Resolution number: 
13
May 1995
Whereas: 
  1. Proposed amendments to the Immigration Act recently announced by the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration will result in one member IRB hearings thereby removing important procedural protections from refugee claimants and increasing the chance of incorrect IRB decisions;
  2. The Minister has previously acknowledged the need for an appeal on the merits for IRB decisions;
  3. The Minister has rejected the recommendations of the Davis/Waldman report and other consultations which support the establishment of an appeal on the merits for IRB decisions;
  4. Past conclusions of the Executive Committee of the UNHCR have stated that signatories to the Refugee Convention should have a process whereby refugee claimants may appeal the merits of a negative decision on their refugee claims;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR strongly express its disappointment and disagreement with the Minister's failure to establish an appeal process whereby unsuccessful refugee claimants could appeal a negative decision of the IRB on the merits.

Subject: 
Working Group: 

Head Tax

Resolution number: 
12
May 1995
Whereas: 
  1. The Right of Landing fee is discriminatory, exclusionary and racist because of the vast variance in country and individual income around the world;
  2. A refugee is accepted or selected for landing in Canada in order to provide protection against persecution, and usually has neither the cash nor a source of income with which to pay the right of landing fee;
  3. Refugees processed through the inland determination system are already subjected to other heavy processing fees;
  4. The Minister in his address to Parliament in November 1994 acknowledged that refugees have special needs and problems;
  5. The UNHCR has documented that no other country in the world charges landing fees to refugees;
Therefore be it resolved: 

that the CCR:

  1. Call for a repeal of the Right of Landing Fee for all newcomers accepted for landing in Canada;
  2. Urge the federal government to recognize the distinctive burden that the "head tax" lays on refugees and their families.
Working Group: 

Security certificate process

Resolution number: 
22
November 1996
Whereas: 
  1. The process under article 40.1 of the Immigration Act provides for mandatory detention when the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration and the Solicitor-General have signed a security certificate for people who may be refugees or refugee claimants.
  2. The person cited in these security certificates does not have the right to know the evidence against them.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Condemn the security certificate process and particularly the provisions for mandatory detention without review and asks for the immediate repeal of this section of the Act.
  2. Urge the Government of Canada to suspend immediately the use of these provisions which clearly violate the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and Canada's international human rights obligations;
  3. Call upon the Canadian Bar Association and human rights NGOs to condemn these procedures which violate fundamental human rights.
Working Group: 

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