Overseas Protection and Resettlement

Overseas Processing of Sierra Leonian Refugees

Resolution number: 
11
May 2002
Whereas: 
  1. The government of Canada has made a commitment to expedite the processing of Sierra Leonean refugees overseas after strongly encouraging Sponsorship Agreement Holders across Canada to get involved in the Sierra Leone special initiative;
  2. The situation in Sierra Leone is still dangerous, unstable and volatile in spite of the presence of a 17,000 member United Nations peacekeeping force and the return of some Sierra Leonean refugees who are still internally displaced. The recent influx of 10,000 Liberian refugees also adds to the instability in Sierra Leone;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR strongly urge the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration to impress upon his Department the need to honour the commitment to refugees, family members in Canada and private sponsors to expedite the processing of the refugees' cases and, in particular, not to refuse cases based upon the changing circumstances in Sierra Leone, which are not conducive for return.

 

NEPAD and refugees

Resolution number: 
15
November 2002
Whereas: 
  1. The causes of refugee flows are persecution as well as human rights violations, civil war, extreme poverty, unfair and unjust global economic relationships, and related factors;
  2. The industrialized countries have expressed commitment to enter a new, meaningful and effective partnership with Africa in the framework of NEPAD;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR urge the Government of Canada to ensure that refugee issues as well as internally displaced persons and returnees occupy high priority in the implementation of NEPAD.

 

African refugee source countries

Resolution number: 
14
November 2002
Whereas: 
  1. Africa continues to be a source of refugees and international migration as a result of internal conflicts and political instabilities;
  2. The Canadian Government has classified a number of African countries as ‘Source Countries' of refugees;
  3. Refugees from these countries are not benefiting from such classification due to logistical and bureaucratic challenges;
  4. The International Region of CIC has not developed any strategic plan to deal with the protection and resettlement of refugees from African Source Countries;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Recommend that the Canadian Government consult with relevant grassroots community based organizations and concerned individuals in formulating program implementation relating to the protection and resettlement of refugees through the source country program so that valuable resources are utilized appropriately;
  2. Urge the International Region of CIC to assign more resources to the processing of refugee applications out of African Source Countries;
  3. Recommend that a joint ad hoc committee of CIC and concerned agencies of CCR be established to undertake a total review of the Source Country Class Program.

Long processing times

Resolution number: 
13
November 2002
Whereas: 
  1. The Government, in the context of private refugee sponsorship, claims to be committed to the principle of additionality;
  2. Visa post staffing was drastically cut in the mid 90s;
  3. The overseas processing time for refugees is disgracefully long. (Departmental informants tell us that currently, from the time the completed IMM8s are received at the visa post until the interview takes place is 21 months in Nairobi and 36 months in Damascus.)
  4. The overseas delays make it increasingly difficult to sustain the interest of sponsors in the private sponsorship program;
  5. The Government is committed to move toward annual immigration targets of 1% of the population of Canada;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR repeatedly challenge the Government, the Minister and senior government officials directly, and through the media, to increase visa post staffing so refugees can be processed expeditiously and in greater numbers.

 

Vietnamese refugees in Palawan

Resolution number: 
12
November 2002
Whereas: 
  1. A Vietnamese group of about 2000 refugees screened out by the Comprehensive Plan of Action still lives in Palawan, Philippines in very poor conditions and without any prospect of a durable solution for either repatriation or local integration;
  2. This group of refugees has ties to Canada through family and other community links;
  3. The Vietnamese Canadian community is offering sponsorship under the Private Sponsorship Program;
  4. UNHCR has acknowledged that this group of persons is in need of a durable solution;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR urge the Government of Canada to consider this group of refugees for resettlement to Canada through the private sponsorship of refugees program.

 

Tibetans in India and Nepal

Resolution number: 
11
November 2002
Whereas: 
  1. Since 1985 many Tibetans have been living in India and Nepal without prospects of local integration;
  2. Today the deteriorating political situation in India and Nepal has further placed these refugees in jeopardy;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR ask CIC to:

  1. Consider the precarious security situations of Tibetans in certain countries of asylum, in particular those in India and Nepal, and to process applications for resettlement to Canada through both the government assisted and the private sponsorship of refugees programs as expeditiously as possible;
  2. Expedite landing and family reunification of Tibetans by accepting their identity documents issued by the Tibetan government in exile.

Referral organizations

Resolution number: 
10
November 2002
Whereas: 
  1. The Canadian Government has enacted new regulations for managing access to the refugee resettlement program;
  2. The new provisions require refugees seeking resettlement to obtain a private sponsorship, or a referral from UNHCR or a designated referral organization;
  3. No referral organizations have been designated to date, other than UNHCR, and none is likely be designated before the end of 2003;
  4. Refugee referrals to the refugee resettlement programme will be insufficient to meet the targets for 2003;
  5. There is a limited exception for direct access for refugee referrals in certain geographic regions which the Minister designates;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR urge the Canadian Government to:

  1. Enhance the ability of UNHCR to refer cases for resettlement until other viable referral mechanisms are put into place;
  2. Make greater use of its authority in S. 150 of IRPR to allow direct access for refugees seeking resettlement.

Voluntary repatriation to Afghanistan

Resolution number: 
9
November 2002
Whereas: 
  1. Voluntary repatriation is one of the durable solutions to the problems of refugees;
  2. According to repatriation guidelines, sustainable living conditions must be ensured before repatriation operations are undertaken;
  3. The current conditions in Afghanistan do not fulfill the required conditions because of security problems, human rights violations and general unrest and instability;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR urge the Government of Canada to:

  1. Provide adequate support to refugees in refugee camps until such time that the conditions become conducive for voluntary repatriation;
  2. Explore other options such as resettlement of Afghan refugees to Canada and that the visa officers assess claims on individual merit an not presumed country conditions.

Resettlement statistics

Resolution number: 
8
November 2002
Whereas: 
  1. In Canada, CIC has engaged a process of revitalizing the private sponsorship of refugees program;
  2. CIC has consistently informed Sponsorship Agreement Holders that there are limited resources for processing applications overseas;
  3. Currently there are applications for over 10,000 individuals and only 2,900 will be processed in this year;
  4. CIC has also given the message that the backlog of private sponsorship applications are due to a high number of cases which do not fit eligibility criteria;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR write to the Director General of the International Region to request a statistical breakdown for the years 2000, 2001 and 2002 and annually thereafter of total private sponsorship undertakings submitted by post by year and total private sponsorship undertakings refused by post by year, and to separate applications and refusals by Groups of Five and Sponsorship Agreement Holder undertakings in order to better understand and address the causes of this backlog.

 

Principles for return of Sri Lankan Tamil refugees in India

Resolution number: 
10
May 2003
Whereas: 
  1. The Government of Sri Lanka and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) have agreed on a cessation of hostilities and began peace negotiations to end almost two decades of civil war;
  2. Sri Lankan Tamil refugees living in refugee camps in India met in February 2003 to discuss the peace process and agree on principles for their possible return home;
  3. The refugees have come out with a Memorandum of Concern stating that their return home should be "safe, orderly and as a consequence of a peace process that is transparent, democratic and inclusive with a visible commitment to protecting the rights of all Ceylon's citizens and the restoration of their social and material well-being";
  4. The refugees have asked for international support of their principles of return;
  5. The principles of return as outlined in the Nallayan Declaration Memorandum of Concern are in line with CCR concerns that refugees have a say in decisions impacting on their lives;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Endorse the Sri Lankan Tamil Refugees Memorandum of Concern outlining principles on return;
  2. Send a copy of the Memorandum of Concern to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, asking that Canada encourage the Sri Lankan Government to take steps to ensure that the refugees' concerns (as outlined in the memorandum of concern) are addressed in the peace process;
  3. Send a copy of the Memorandum of Concern to the Minister for International Cooperation, asking that her department (CIDA) provide financial support to demining and rehabilitation/reconstruction efforts in Sri Lanka;
  4. Ask the Government of Canada to encourage UNHCR to take steps to ensure that the refugees' concerns (as outlined in the memorandum of concern) are addressed in discussions, plans and programs on the possible voluntary return of the refugees home.

Cost recovery mechanisms for referrals

Resolution number: 
9
May 2003
Whereas: 
  1. CCR Resolution 39, June 1994 condemned cost recovery fees for Convention refugees and their dependants and requested that processing fees be eliminated for refugees and CCR Resolution 12, May 1995, called the Right of Landing Fee discriminatory, exclusionary and racist and called for the repeal of the Right of Landing Fee for all newcomers to Canada while recognizing the particular burden the head tax laid on refugees;
  2. CIC is likely to implement a "user pay" cost recovery fee to pay organizations abroad who are contracted to refer and/or process refugees for resettlement to Canada. The cost recovery mechanism will create additional debt burdens for refugees resettled to Canada;
  3. The cost recovery mechanism creates a two-tier system for refugees seeking resettlement because neither sponsors nor UNHCR charge fees to refugees for referral;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Reiterate its condemnation of the charging of application and/or processing fees and oppose the application of any new charges to refugees resettled to Canada, based on the resettlement referral;
  2. Call on CIC to ensure that sufficient funds are available through its own program budget funding to facilitate the applications, referrals and processing of all refugees abroad accepted for permanent residence.

Iraq

Resolution number: 
8
May 2003
Whereas: 

The on-going humanitarian and human insecurity problems continue to plague Iraqis displaced inside or outside the country;

Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Urge CIC to consider as a basis for a refugee claim the ongoing insecurity in the country when assessing applications for resettlement from Iraqis and process them fully;
  2. Raise with the Canadian government the need for: a)the immediate and ongoing clearing of unexploded ordinances including cluster bombs and landmines; b)a gendered understanding of the current humanitarian crisis in Iraq, that humanitarian and relief projects be particularly nuanced to address the needs of women and girls in war-torn Iraq, and that reconstruction projects in Iraq promote women in central and vital roles in the re-building of the institutions of civil and political life of the country.

Assistance to refugees

Resolution number: 
7
May 2003
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR is concerned globally with the plight of refugees and refugee welfare in their area or place of refuge;
  2. Financial assistance provided by CIDA multilaterally to UN agencies and other coordinating bodies does not always result in improving the actual provision of material assistance (food, water, shelter, non-food items, etc.) to refugees;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR urge CIDA to:

  1. In addition to providing funding to UN agencies, continue to provide humanitarian funding directly to non-governmental implementing organizations providing material assistance directly to refugees;
  2. Remain aware of the effectiveness and positive impact of aid provided to refugees and displaced persons;
  3. Increase the proportion of Official Development Assistance (ODA) directed to humanitarian relief and development assistance going to refugee situations and protracted camp situations.

Refugee women at risk

Resolution number: 
6
May 2003
Whereas: 

CCR Resolution 8, Nov. 1993 called for physical protection of refugee women in Africa and Resolution 17, June 1994 called for women at risk to have interviews waived;

Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Urge the Government of Canada to assign more officers to African visa posts, particularly Accra, Abidjan and Nairobi, with a mandate to process women at risk refugee files, and to ensure expedited processing by waiving interviews where UNHCR records are clear and complete to allow for in-Canada security and medicals where the woman and her dependant children's well-being is in doubt;
  2. Urge UNHCR to send additional resettlement officers to Africa for the identification and selection of women at risk;
  3. Urge CIDA to increase funding for the identification and protection of refugee women at risk and their children;
  4. Urge the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration to direct visa officers to comply with their own overseas protection guidelines in processing vulnerable and at risk refugee cases (3 to 6 months).

Refugee resettlement targets

Resolution number: 
14
November 2003
Whereas: 
  1. CCR is celebrating 25 years of private sponsorship in Canada;
  2. Canada's resettlement targets, including for private sponsorship, have largely remained unchanged for the past 10 years, even though overall immigration targets have increased;
  3. An increase in overall resettlement targets reflects a commitment to refugee resettlement and may lead to an increase in resource allocation to resettlement processing.
  4. CCR has consistently maintained the three principles of private sponsorship; partnership, additionality and naming;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Urge the Canadian Government to set resettlement targets at a minimum of 8% of overall immigration targets, while respecting the private sponsorship principle of additionality;
  2. Work together with the SAH representatives to the NGO-Government Committee on the Private Sponsorship of Refugees to negotiate annual private sponsorship targets with CIC.

Ministerial relief

Resolution number: 
13
November 2003
Whereas: 
  1. A significant number of refugees applying for private sponsorship are found to be inadmissible pursuant to s. 34(1) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act;
  2. These refugees are entitled to request Ministerial Relief, and an exemption from inadmissibility, pursuant to s. 34(2) of IRPA, on the grounds that it would not be detrimental to Canada's national interest to admit them to Canada;
  3. The CIC policy manuals advise visa officers to consider Ministerial Relief only in cases where it is specifically requested by refugees;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Urge the Canadian Government to require that visa officers advise refugees and other applicants for permanent residence of the option to apply for Ministerial Relief pursuant to s. 34(2) of IRPA in cases where they are considering rejection of their case pursuant to s. 34(1).
  2. Write to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration about the significance of Ministerial Relief and ask the Minister to act more generously in issuing Ministerial Relief.

Statelessness

Resolution number: 
12
November 2003
Whereas: 
  1. Stateless people are in a vulnerable situation because they have no protection from a state;
  2. IRPA does not specify stateless persons as a group needing protection or eligible for landing on humanitarian and compassionate grounds.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Strongly urge the Minister to amend IRPA to include statelessness as a ground for protection (both in Canada and for resettlement).
  2. In the alternative, use the authority of subsection 25(1) to establish "protection of stateless persons" as a public policy category for permanent residence and amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations to include statelessness as a ground for resettlement to Canada.
  3. As an interim measure urge CIC to amend the Immigration Manual, Chapter IP5, to include statelessness as a factor for landing in H&C applications. ID requirements and establishment requirements should be waived in view of the special hardships faced by stateless persons.

Dadaab and Kakuma

Resolution number: 
11
November 2003
Whereas: 
  1. There are more than 120,000 refugees in the Dadaab camps and 86,000 in Kakuma refugee camp from several different African countries who have been resident there for up to 14 years;
  2. Peace processes are underway in the region, which have potential implications to refugees such as possible reduction of services and closure of camps;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Urge the UNHCR to ensure that conducive conditions exist before beginning any voluntary repatriation of refugees from the camps.
  2. Urge the UNHCR to continue to promote resettlement as a durable solution for these refugees.
  3. Encourage the Canadian government to continue to actively assist the UNHCR in promoting resettlement as a durable solution for these vulnerable populations;
  4. Encourage the Canadian government to increase funding to the UNHCR and WFP programs and services in the camps.

Liberian refugees

Resolution number: 
10
November 2003
Whereas: 
  1. Refugees from Liberia have continued to flee to Tabour Camp in Ivory Coast and to Buduburam Camp in Ghana;
  2. Canadians from Liberia are in regular communication with these refugees;
  3. There is presently no hope for early repatriation or local integration;
  4. The camps are seriously ill-equipped to protect their residents;
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Call on the Government of Canada to urge the UNHCR to provide humanitarian aid adequate for the safety, health and maintenance of these vulnerable populations.
  2. Urge Citizenship and Immigration Canada to expedite early resettlement of persons in urgent need of resettlement.

Ethnic cleansing in Darfur (Sudan)

Resolution number: 
14
May 2004
Whereas: 

The government of Sudan is engaged in a policy of ethnic cleansing against the population of the Darfur region, as it has done in the past against other ethnic groups in the country.

Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR urge the Canadian government to:

  1. Send a strong protest to the government of Sudan condemning its deliberate policy of ethnic cleansing in Darfur region and requesting the government of Sudan to grant full and unhindered access to Darfur region by international organizations.
  2. Raise the issue of ethnic cleansing in Darfur at the UN Commission on Human Rights (UNCHR) and other international for a.
  3. Explore the possibility of joining in a fact finding trip to Darfur region.

Torture in Iraq

Resolution number: 
13
May 2004
Whereas: 
  1. The news about torture, murders and disappearance of prisoners in Iraq, Afghanistan and Guantanamo Bay by American and coalition forces has shocked the conscience of the world and has led to widespread reaction in the USA and elsewhere.
  2. An Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture, dealing with the mandate of the UN Committee against Torture to enter and monitor conditions in places of detention, has been adopted by the UN General Assembly and is ready for accession.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR write to the Prime Minister of Canada demanding that Canada:

  1. Make a public condemnation of torture in Iraq and Afghanistan by US and coalition forces, and ask for the US administration to:a) Adhere to the international legal instruments against torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. b) Train US military personnel and other enforcement official to adhere to these human rights standards. c) Allow outside inspection of US-controlled jails, detention centres and other facilities where persons are detained. d) Designate an independent ombudsperson to receive complains about torture and other human rights abuses.
  2. Accede to the UN Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and encourage other countries – including and especially the USA – to do the same.

Repatriation

Resolution number: 
12
May 2004
Whereas: 
  1. UNHCR recognizes voluntary repatriation as one of the three durable solutions and thus actively promotes it when and where conditions permit.
  2. These conditions must be not merely transient but fundamental such as the restoration and rehabilitation of infrastructure, restitution of land and lost property, and all other factors which make voluntary repatriation sustainable.
  3. It is crucial that refugees, including refugee women, have a say in all decisions and activities that affect them, including decisions and activities on voluntary repatriation.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR ask the Government of Canada to urge UNHCR to insist as a matter of principle in its discussions and negotiations with host governments and governments of countries of origin that refugees, especially refugee women, be included as active partners in the negotiation, planning and implementation of all voluntary repatriation processes.

Interim Federal Health issues

Resolution number: 
11
May 2004
Whereas: 
  1. The problems with the IFH program have been mounting.
  2. The IFH Advisory Committee has become inactive.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR urge Medical Services Branch to mobilize the IFH Advisory Committee to develop solutions to: a) registration problems b) the complex claim process c) the slow reimbursement scheme d) inadequate resources for increasing special needs.

Subject: 

Slow processing times

Resolution number: 
10
May 2004
Whereas: 
  1. There is a long, 2-3 year backlog of privately sponsored refugee applications.
  2. CCR adopted Res. 13, May 02 on long processing times.
  3. All government-assisted refugees (GARs) are now referred by the UNHCR (other than in source countries) and CCR has repeatedly been told that there are limited visa office resources.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR urge CIC to simplify the overseas refugee determination process, and to eliminate the perennial backlog by not re-interviewing UNHCR referred GARs, and through temporary staff re-deployments.

Resettlement, durable solutions and signatory countries

Resolution number: 
9
May 2004
Whereas: 
  1. The CCR adopted Resolution 5, Dec. 1999 drawing CIC’s attention to the inconsistency of interpretation of ‘durable solution’ and calling for an interpretation that specified that temporary protection and eligibility for future refugee determination do not constitute a ‘durable solution’.
  2. CIC’s manual chapter OP5 fails to provide clarity to the interpretation of ‘durable solution’, and continues to blend the concepts of ‘signatory countries’ and ‘fair and effective protection regimes’.
  3. The language used in OP5 does not conform to the regulatory provisions in IRPA.
  4. CIC created the policy in OP5 of ‘signatory countries’ as a limitation to access the Canadian resettlement stream even though IRPA provides no such limitation.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Urge CIC to abandon the use of concepts of ‘signatory countries’ and ‘fair and effective protection regimes’ and focus its attention on the availability of a durable solution for the individual applicant.
  2. Urge that OP5 be amended to conform to IRPA and to set out that there is no reasonable prospect of a durable solution in all those situations where it has been improperly applied, and in particular, those situations where: a)    a refugee claim has been made in the country where the person is located and rejected.

     

     b)    the determination of a refugee claim in the country where the person is located is subject to undue delays.

     

     c)    a refugee claim is pending in the country where the person is located and likely to be rejected for the reason that the concept of protection is applied more narrowly by that country than by Canada.

     

     d)    the person has been denied access to the local refugee determination regime because of the person’s own prior irrevocable waiver of the right to access the refugee determination system.
  3. Request that CIC:
    a) make it clear to sponsors and the applicant when CIC believes that applicants are in a country where local integration may represent a durable solution.
    b) indicate concretely what the proposed durable solution is.

     

     
    c) allow the sponsors and the applicant to rebut that presumption.
  4. Urge its members to litigate failed resettlement cases where ‘signatory country’ was the issue.

CIC’s reaction to the Turkish government’s exit permit requirement for privately sponsored refugees

Resolution number: 
8
May 2004
Whereas: 
  1. There have been long-standing difficulties in obtaining exit permits from Turkey for privately sponsored refugees.
  2. CIC has decided unilaterally to close all current private sponsorship files, including cases which have already been accepted by the visa post to come to Canada.
  3. The Sponsorship Agreement states that the Private Sponsorship of Refugees Program “is a symbiotic partnership between SAHs and CIC wherein each relies on the other to fulfill their responsibilities in order for the program to succeed” and “the partnership … provides a framework where SAHs may collaborate with CIC to respond to special measures … and emergency situations” (Principles b and g).
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Urge CIC to keep all current private sponsorship files in Turkey open until all avenues have been pursued and until such time as an agreement can be reached with the SAH representatives, and to lift the ban on new undertakings, pending a solution(s) to the exit permit issues.
  2. Urge the government of Canada to continue working with the Multilateral Technical Committee to find a solution(s) to the current and future Turkish exit permit issues.
  3. Urge CIC to respect the terms of the SAH agreement (Principles b and g) and work in full collaboration with elected SAH representatives in further negotiations.
  4. Urge UNHCR to take proactive steps to assist in facilitating the departure from Turkey of persons accepted by the Canadian visa post.

Overseas processing and targets

Resolution number: 
10
November 2004
Whereas: 
  1. Overseas processing targets are inadequate, as reported in the “No Faster Way?” and “More than a Nightmare” documents, to meet demand in the family reunification and refugee sponsorship queues;
  2. Canada has an obligation to respond to the legitimate needs of Canadians, including its refugee sponsorship community and its separated families.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Urge the Government to review the 60/40 ratio in order to increase the numbers of Humanitarian class cases being processed.
  2. Urge the Government to establish and implement service standards for all immigration categories which are simple, fast (in less than 8-12 months) and accessible.
  3. Reaffirm a consistent application for all posts of the policy priorizing refugees.

Iraq

Resolution number: 
9
November 2004
Whereas: 
  1. The violence and lawlessness in Iraq continues to escalate and the possibility of a peaceful solution does not seem imminent,
  2. Many Canadian families have been impacted by resulting tragedies,
  3. Relatives and friends and former neighbours of Canadians are fleeing Iraq for Syria, Jordan and Turkey on a daily basis,
  4. They feel compelled to flee because a member of their family has already been targeted and killed, because they have received death threats, because their children have been kidnapped and held for ransom or because of vendettas in the context of lawlessness,
  5. The UNHCR has suspended Refugee Status Determination for Iraqis and
  6. Those who have sought asylum in Turkey, Syria and Jordan are struggling to meet their basic needs because they left their belongings behind and they are not allowed to work.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Urgently request the UNHCR to immediately: i)    Resume refugee status determination for Iraqis in the region, ii)    Provide care and support for Iraqis who have sought asylum in these countries, iii)    Dialogue with resettlement countries including Canada to implement resettlement as a solution for Iraqis in the region,
  2. Urge the Government of Canada to immediately: i)    Dialogue with the UNHCR to facilitate the resettlement of Iraqi refugees through the Private Sponsorship Program as well as the Government Assisted Refugee Program, ii)    Increase staff in the Damascus Visa Post to accommodate the increased need for resettlement from the region and to expedite cases already in process.

Support for repatriation

Resolution number: 
8
November 2004
Whereas: 
  1. UNHCR’s stated mandate is to facilitate and support the voluntary repatriation of refugees in safety and dignity to their home countries when conditions within the country are sufficiently stable to sustain their return.
  2. The international community has strong interest involuntary repatriation as a durable solution for refugees
  3. The international community are donors of UNHCR and financially support its efforts.
  4. The levels of support to sustain persons during their repatriation process are grossly inadequate and do not provide the means forre-establishment. This is the situation for Sierra Leoneans currently repatriating.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR request the government of Canada to work with the UNHCR and other countries to increase the levels of support and security given to refugees repatriating through UNHCR initiatives.

Darfur

Resolution number: 
7
November 2004
Whereas: 
  1. The political situation in the Darfur Region of the Sudan continues to deteriorate, with widespread human rights violations leading to deaths of an estimated quarter of a million people.
  2. The government of the Sudan refuses to yield to the international pressures to put an end to the conflict.
Therefore be it resolved: 

That the CCR:

  1. Urge the Canadian government to:

    i)    Use all available means, including by adding its voice to those who have already named the situation as genocide, to ensure that the international community intervenes to stop the abuses.ii)    Put more pressure on the Sudan government to immediately end the conflict against the Fur people by suspending all aid to the Sudan except humanitarian aid.iii)    Encourage and support the African Union to intercede in the conflict in Darfur.iv)    Assist the UNHCR in providing humanitarian aid for safety, health and maintenance of refugees in Chad and internally displaced persons in the Sudan.

  2. Urge the UNHCR to expedite the resettlement processing of vulnerable Furians in refugee camps in Chad.

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