Workshops, CCR consultation, Spring 2017

For the overall agenda, see the consultation program.

Thursday 10:30 - 12 noon

Opening plenary spring 2017

The opening plenary features as keynote speaker Lewis Cardinal, Indigenous community advocate.

Organized by: Executive

Thursday 1:30pm - 3pm

Alternatives to detention

The Canadian government is planning to implement alternatives to detention across Canada. The CCR's proposed community-based model will be presented and discussed in this workshop.

Organized by: Inland Protection

(En)Countering Hate in Canada

In this workshop, panelists will speak from three different perspectives, bringing a deep understanding of racial justice and a set of diverse lived experiences into a conversation about anti-Indigenous racism, Islamophobia, and xenophobia. They will discuss similarities between these diverse groups and speak to how this affects the settlement and integration of refugees. As voices of fear, anger and hate are more openly expressed across Canada, they give rise to biases, prejudices and discriminatory attitudes and behaviours. The workshop will look at the unique and common roots of dynamics of othering and exclusion, and identify opportunities and strategies to build and nurture communities that appreciate and embrace their diversity.

The workshop will consist of three panel speakers, followed by a question period. During the question period we will be asking participants to focus on action items and resolutions going forward. 

Organized by: Anti-oppression, I&S

The view from Central America

With speakers from Central America, USA and Canada, this workshop will provide a regional context to our consideration of migration issues. The workshop will also provide information on CCR's current role as the Technical Secretariat for RROCM.

Organized by: Executive

Innovative Settlement Service Delivery

In an effort to acknowledge and meet the changing needs of the newcomer demographic and diverse populations, this workshop will focus on new and innovative ways of delivering settlement services using best practice models, technology, and other methods. The panel will address various approaches and organizational practices that are necessary to reach participants and communities outside of the established boundaries and norms. In seeking the best possible outcomes for newcomers, the choice facing settlement agencies is not whether to change but how. 

Organized by: Immigration and Settlement

Thursday 3:30pm - 5pm

Newcomer Youth Civic Engagement

This workshop will involve discussion with youth leaders in their communities around different youth-led and art-based initiatives that they have worked on locally.  Participants will reflect on why these initiatives are crucial for the newcomer youth and the communities involved.

Organized by: Youth Network

Sanctuary cities and regularization

This session will explore what an ‘Access Without Fear’ policy can mean in Canadian municipalities. We will hear about community and municipal government efforts on building access to services for people without immigration status, as well as reflections on the regularization of status. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss practical organizing strategies.

Organized by: Immigration and Settlement

US-Canada Safe third country

This workshop will look at the current situation of refugees in the US, what advice can be given to those who might want to make a claim in Canada, how the Safe Third Country exceptions function and how we in Canada can best respond to increased numbers of refugee claimants. There will also be an update on litigation.

Organized by: Inland Protection

Root causes of displacement: Canadian implication

The root causes of forced displacement are varied and complex. Full analysis of them involves examination of both internal and external, immediate and long-term factors. This workshop will focus on a number of situations in which Canada and/or Canadian business interests have contributed directly or indirectly to forced displacement. It will also consider ways in which Canada could contribute positively to the resolution of these situations.

Organized by: OPS

Friday 9am - 10:30am

Violence Against Women: Identifying Solutions and Partnerships

This workshop will examine violence against women from both a refugee perspective, and an indigenous perspective. By examining the similarities and differences between the two groups, we will work to identify solutions to violence against women and build an understanding of what it means to have indigenous inclusion in the settlement and integration sector. We will hear from three experts on the subject, and will take time to build strategies as a group that can be shared throughout the non-profit and policy sector.

 

Organized by: Immigration and Settlement

Dialogue with government representatives

This session will feature a dialogue with Fraser Valentine, Director General, Refugee Affairs Branch, and Corinne Prince St-Amand, Director General, Integration, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada.

Organized by: Executive

Climate Change and Forced Displacement: What can we do?

The workshop takes stock of the work carried out globally around the topic of climate change and migration by diverse agencies and actors. It then engages participants in the question: What can we do here in Canada? How does this topic intersect with CCR’s work?

Organized by: Executive
Sponsored by:
Bredin Centre for Learning

Friday 11am - 12:30pm

Global resettlement in uncertain times

This workshop will explore current global protection needs and the shifting realities in resettlement – Canada’s response, emerging resettlement programs in other countries, and the impact of the US decision to reduce its 2017 commitment to resettlement. 

Organized by: OPS

Inspiring practices – new paths working with refugee claimants

This workshop will feature speakers from community organizations in British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec, who will share their organization’s experiences working with refugee claimants, including innovative practices, funding opportunities or constraints, and responses to the current challenges.  Participants will discuss ways to better respond to the needs of refugee claimants.

Organized by: Joint workshop - IP and I&S

Training: Vicarious Trauma and Self Care

This workshop will provide frontline staff and management with knowledge about vicarious trauma, strategies on how to recognize the risks and address Vicarious trauma. Participants will engage in case study discussions and self-reflection exercises, and will be given a resource tool kit.

Organized by: Executive

Effective strategies for engaging local communities

This workshop will explore concrete solutions and approaches to resolve challenges faced by refugees. There will be particular focus on multisectoral, community-centred projects in both smaller communities and larger urban centres. We will also look at how public perceptions are involved in resolving these challenges.

After hearing about select local experiences and lessons learned, participants will discuss and compile a list of promising practices and tips to launch similar efforts at home.

Organized by: Executive

Friday 1:30 - 3pm

Building on positive Canadian energy for refugees

This participatory workshop will provide an opportunity to share stories of success and best practices from across Canada emerging from the recent growth in private sponsorship of refugees.

Organized by: OPS

Changes in refugee determination system

Following evaluations of the current refugee determination system and consultations on potential reforms, what does the future hold? This question will be on the agenda for this workshop, along with discussions on making refugee hearings at the IRB as efficient as possible, in the context of rising refugee claim numbers.

Organized by: Inland Protection

Different faces of exploitation: promising practices for service provision and policy change

This 90-minute interactive workshop will provide an overview of the spectrum of exploitation (when does exploitation become trafficking and why it matters), as well as promising practices in service provision from grassroots and service agency perspectives. It will also address the need for policy change to protect the rights of exploited persons. After a dynamic panel discussion, a facilitator will lead participants in a group discussion on how to put promising strategies into practice.

Organized by: Anti-Trafficking Committee, Migrant Workers Committee

Saturday 11am - 1pm

Closing plenary spring 2017

The closing session will offer an opportunity to hear from a closing speaker, recap the highlights of the consultation and debate resolutions. The session will include the CCR Spring General Meeting. 

Organized by: Executive