Resolutions adopted May 1998

Whereas:
  1. Visa officers appear to be refusing an increasing number of privately sponsored refugee applicants;
  2. There is no appeal from such refusals except by way of judicial review which few applicants are aware of or resourced to pursue;
  3. Canada Immigration National Headquarters staff have indicated no more exact figure than that between 40% and 60% of privately sponsored refugees are refused;
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR:

  1. Obtain from the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration broad based statistical information on refusals of privately sponsored applications.
  2. Request that the Minister put in place policy which requires visa posts to give sponsoring groups and refugee applicants detailed reasons for the refusal of an application.
Whereas:

Groups applying for Joint Assistance Sponsorships for Women at Risk can face unexpected requests for travel costs in addition to the resettlement support they promised;

Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR urge the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration to:

  1. Ensure that Canada's response to its international obligations with respect to refugees such as women at risk is unambiguous and independent of voluntary cash contributions from the Canadians who are willing to make possible resettlement by the government in other ways;
  2. Introduce clarity into refugee resettlement programs so that Canadians who come forward to assist the government can predict the costs before they begin and do not suddenly face requests for cash contributions for travel costs.
Whereas:
  1. There are Convention Refugees, particularly Iranians, who have applied for landing and had CSIS interviews but have had their landing held up for years in the Security Reviews in case management;
  2. They are unable to travel outside Canada, sponsor family or pursue post-secondary education;
Therefore be it resolved:

That CCR request a meeting between CIC and the CCR and affected communities to discuss landing delays for security reasons.

Whereas:
  1. Board members are under pressure to move quickly on cases at the expense of fairness, thus violating the fundamental right of refugee claimants to a fair and impartial hearing;
  2. The Montreal IRB has started giving negative decisions with no credible basis in a systematic and abusive fashion;
  3. There is a serious problem with Board members not treating fairly victims of torture and a general problem of insensitivity linked to a lack of proper training for Board members;
Therefore be it resolved:

That the CCR:

  1. Express our opposition to increased findings of no credible basis in Montreal and call on the IRB to cease abusive use of such findings.
  2. Request training of IRB members with the active involvement of the UNHCR, the Canadian Bar, the CCR and other appropriate NGOs. This training must include sensitivity training on treatment of torture victims, a code of ethics for Board members and training on the rules of fundamental justice.